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Withybush shake-up in battle to keep understaffed A&E open

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withybushhospMANY PATIENTS from Pembrokeshire will no longer be treated at Withybush Hospital and will be diverted to Glanwgili in Carmarthen in a major shake up by health bosses, who say they are fire fighting to keep 24 hour A&E services open in Haverfordwest.

For the time-being at least, Withybush will no longer truly be a ‘county hospital’.

The Health Board has confirmed to The Herald that the number of patients admitted to Withybush Hospital overall will be reduced so that the UHB can “safely maintain a 24/7 service” with the few doctors available.

This will be achieved; it has been announced, by temporarily changing the catchment area of Withybush Hospital, diverting GP admissions and ambulance transfers from Cardigan, Narberth, Kilgetty, Saundersfoot and Tenby to Glanwgili Hospital, Carmarthen.

Struggle to maintain a 24 hour service: Withybush A&E

Struggle to maintain a 24 hour service: Withybush A&E

In a statement released yesterday (Jul 16), health bosses have reiterated that Withybush is facing a temporary shortage of doctors. The Health Board said that foreign doctors they have recruited to help elevate the problem are awaiting visas so they can travel to the UK to take up their new positions.

That being the case,  they said, an action plan had to be put in place to “enable the hospital to safely care for patients and keep the medical intake and the Emergency and Urgent Care Centre open.”

READ OUR IN DEPTH REPORT IN THE HERALD TOMORROW 

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Newcastle Emlyn: Luke Cuber-Hives burgled and set fire to Adpar heath shop

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A CARMARTHEN man has been jailed for the burglary and arson of the Riverside Health Shop in Adpar, Ceredigion last year.

Luke Cuber-Hives now of of Ty Croeso, Adpar, Newcastle Emlyn has been handed 54 months in custody.

Police have said: “An extensive enquiry received the support of the local community, who identified his involvement in further theft and fraud offences. Cuber-Hives appeared before
Swansea Crown Court yesterday, where he received a jail term totalling 54 months.”

Detective Inspector Richard Yelland, senior investigating officer into the enquiry, told The Ceredigion Herald: “This sentence sends a strong message that arson is a serious and dangerous act.

“Ceredigion has seen first-hand the devastating impact these mindless acts can have on victims, and the fear it spreads in the community. We saw in Aberystwyth that fire can quickly take hold and lives can be lost.

“In this case it appears, the fact that nobody was hurt was due to luck, rather than the judgement of Mr Cuber-Hives.

“I hope that anyone considering such behaviour will think twice before committing such offences with a long prison sentence waiting for those who get caught.”
The incident took place in the early hours of November 27, 2018

The 28-year-old was charged with stealing five charity collection boxes to a value unknown from Riverside Health Shop between November 26-27; committing fraud at Newcastle Emlyn by claiming he was collecting money for charity on November 26 and also stealing a set of ladders and marble worktop worth £350 from Riverside Café between November 19-20

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West Wales responds to Notre-Dame ‘tragedy’

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Notre-Dame de Paris: The large fire partially destroyed the cathedral on Monday

THE WORLD has reacted to the major fire that partially destroyed Notre-Dame Cathedral, with religious leaders of west Wales among those to have sent prayers to Paris.

The large fire on Monday (Apr 15) damaged much of the historic landmark, destroying the roof as well as the famous spire. The fire began at around 6:30pm local time (4:30pm GMT) and it took until 10am (8am GMT) on Tuesday morning for firefighters to fully extinguish the blaze. Many of the relics held in the cathedral, including the crown of thorns brought there in 1239 by St. Louis, said to be that which was placed on the head of Jesus leading up to his crucifixion, were saved by firefighters. One firefighter is said to have suffered minor injuries while tackling the fire. The cause of the fire is not yet clear, but Paris’ public prosecutor is working under the assumption that it was an accident.

Whilst the principal structure was saved, including the famed towers, the building is still seen as unstable. Prior to the fire, there was already scaffolding in place to deal with the cracks appearing in the stonework. Renovations were underway and 16 copper statues had already been removed last week.

Notre-Dame de Paris, meaning ‘Our Lady of Paris’, is one of the most widely recognised symbols of France, and is recognised as a UNESCO World Heritage site. The site of the cathedral is thought to have been of religious significance dating back as far as Roman Gaul. The construction of the modern church began in 1163, and the cathedral is considered one of the finest examples of French Gothic architecture.

Already hundreds of millions of euros have been donated towards the reconstruction of the site, as people across the world have reacted to the news and sent both prayers and funds to Paris.

Bishop of Menevia Tom Burns said: “For a thousand years it has stood as a beacon of prayer and hope. But what a tragedy struck Paris and the French nation on Monday evening at the Cathedral of Notre-Dame. It is a beautiful creation that resides at the very heart of French life and in the hearts of French people wherever they happen to be, of whatever faith or none. It has struck chords in all people of good will who have walked through its doors into an arena of peace and calm.

“Some years ago, after wondering at the flying-buttresses that supported the thick stone walls, I had entered under that roof, never conscious of the vulnerability of its wooden structure. As I saw on television on Monday evening the fire raging through the roof, and the spire disintegrating piece by piece, I felt a lump in my throat. I shared with the people of France my sense of having once touched something quite unique. For, it had been my privilege, as Bishop of HM Forces, to preach from the Cathedral’s vast pulpit on Remembrance Sunday just over a decade ago.

“Now this was another sad occasion to remember, though thankfully without any loss of life. As York Minster was resurrected from the flames some years ago, and similarly Windsor Castle in more recent times, may the experts in restoring ancient buildings combine their God-given skills to rebuilding Notre-Dame de Paris. May it rise from the ashes to fulfil its function as God’s House in this world and to re-assure us that such a building evokes belonging and inspires us to greater things. It is still greatly needed, if not even more so now.”

Fr. Liam Bradley, Parish Priest at St David and St Patrick Church in Haverfordwest, said: “We hold in our hearts and prayers those who take risks to save life and property. May God bless the skills of craftsmen and women as they undertake the task of rebuilding.

“God our Father, let the community of Paris come together in this moment of difficulty and grace, to rebuild your house and do you honour, and so provide an enduring monument of how high the human spirit can soar in the face of adversity.

“As buildings crumble, may our faith be strong; from the ashes, may new fruit be born. Through the intercession of Our Lady of Paris, may all the people of France be filled with the peace and joy of Jesus Christ, risen for us at Easter. Amen.

“St Denis – Pray for us!”

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Aberystwyth: Coopers sentenced over serious neglect of cattle

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A SENTENCING hearing was held on 10 April at Aberystwyth Magistrates Court to consider the guilty pleas submitted by Mrs. Margaret Cooper, 80 yrs old and Mr. Norman Richard Cooper, 55 yrs old. of Gilfachwith Farm, Bangor Teifi, in relation to the death and serious neglect of 84 cattle.

The prosecution follows an investigation by Ceredigion County Council Animal Health Officers, who visited the farm in May 2018 together with officials from the Animal and Plant Health Agency.

The Officers encountered scenes of utter devastation with dead cattle decaying in the livestock sheds. There were surviving cattle housed with these carcasses, and found to be suffering unnecessarily from neglect. The vet confirmed that the cattle were being caused unnecessary suffering, and the decision was made to take the remaining live cattle into the possession of the Council to prevent any further suffering. Some animals had to be dispatched following examination, due to the serious health conditions they had developed as a result of their suffering.

Ceredigion County Council’s Corportate Lead Officer for Policy and Performance, Alun Williams said, “The Animal Health Officers involved with this case have never experienced such appalling conditions at any farm in their careers. Most of the staff are from farming backgrounds, but they faced horrific circumstances in investigating and retrieving the live animals and the carcasses. This case does not reflect the usual high standards of animal husbandry that is the norm in the two and a half thousand farms in Ceredigion. Nevertheless, we remain vigilant, as this is unfortunately the second such case we have prosecuted in a matter of months. My gratitude to Council staff and to our solicitor in prosecuting this case is immense. I would also like to express my thanks to the Animal and Plant Health Agency, Rural Inspectorate of Wales, and the Police for working closely with the Council in dealing with the worst case of farm animal neglect in Wales in recent times.”

In sentencing, the Chair of the Magistrates said, “This was a horrendous case, as you know. We believe that your actions led to the sustained neglect of these animals, in that they were not provided with basic care needs, food, water, and bedding; dying tied to their stalls. There is clear evidence they have suffered over a long period of time. Also carcasses of those that had died were mixed in with those that were living, it was horrendous”.

Mrs. Cooper and Mr. Cooper were sentenced to six months imprisonment suspended for two years, and disqualified from keeping any animals for ten years, with the only exception is that they are allowed to keep their four elderly dogs for the duration of the dogs lives. Mr Cooper was also ordered to undertake 150 hours of unpaid work. They were ordered to pay costs to the Council of £2,500 each, with a victim surcharge of £115 each.

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