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‘Still a force of nature’

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cynogdafCYNOG DAFIS, former MP, former AM, a man of renowned high principle and strong views. Officially recognised as the first Green MP. A man described to The Herald as ‘very much still a force of nature’ and one never afraid of expressing views strongly held in equally strong, clear language.

We asked Cynog Dafis for his insights on one of the largest, if not the largest, issue facing Wales at the moment, the EU referendum scheduled for June 23. We were delighted when he accommodated our request and here’s what he had to say:

FOR WALES AND FOR EUROPE, LET’S STAY IN THE EU by Cynog Dafis

Cynog told us: “The tragedy of the current debate about Britain and Europe is that it is conducted in terms of them and us. The European Union is about us: all the peoples of Europe, working together for the common good. The growth of this common identity over the last sixty years has been vital in keeping the European peace and the strengthening of democracy.” He continued: “Solidarity is a fundamental principle of the EU. Richer countries contribute resources to help raise the economic performance of poorer ones. Britain and Germany, rich countries, are ‘net contributors’ – they contribute more than they receive.

“Wales, as a poorer nation within the rich British state, receives much more that it contributes. This is as it should be. The EU created the Structural Funds for precisely this purpose. They have been, as in the case of Ireland, highly successful. That they have been less so in Wales has more to do with failures of Welsh Government than with the Funds themselves.” Cynog Dafis was scornful of claims made by those who wish to leave the EU: “Eurosceptics argue that Britain outside the EU would provide equivalent support for nations and regions like Wales. There is no reason to believe them.

Britain under Margaret Thatcher dismantled regional development policy and presided over the economic decline of Wales and Northern England. Britain has led the charge within the EU for cuts to the structural funds and support for agriculture, so vital for our rural economy. “Outside the EU Wales would be left to the tender mercies of a right-wing London Government whose priority is London and the English South and regards the notion of solidarity with derision.” On the issue of EU bureaucracy, Cynog Dafis provided robust analysis: “Eurosceptics also complain about EU regulation, sometimes with reason.

European regulations however require approval by the European Council of Ministers of which Britain is among the most powerful members and are subject to modification by member-state parliaments (and indeed in many cases by our own National Assembly). “Outside the EU there would still be regulation, to protect the environment and workers’ rights and to promote health and safety. It us the easiest thing in the world to ‘blame Europe’ for decisions, sometimes unpopular, which are important for the general good. Surely it makes sense for the countries of Europe to make these decisions jointly, rather than seek selfish competitive advantage by cutting corners and lowering standards.” On the challenges facing the European Union, Cynog was clear: “The EU today is under pressure as never before.

Migration both within and from beyond Europe’s borders raises serious and complex issues, economic, social and humanitarian. These have been exacerbated by the rapid expansion of the EU following the collapse of communism. Including countries with weaker economies like Greece within the Euro was a major strategic error.” And on Britain’s future he was trenchant: “For Britain to leave the EU would intensify, not solve, the crisis at a time when above all we need stability, cooperation and joint protection against a whole range of threats, including terrorism. It would further destabilise Europe when cool-headed reform is what we need. Everyone would lose and Wales would be among the biggest losers.

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New Quay RNLI lifeboat crew trains with lifeguards

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NEW QUAY lifeboat station hosted a special training evening with the lifeboat crew and Ceredigion’s RNLI lifeguards last week.

Pete Yates, one of New Quay RNLI’s inshore lifeboat helms, worked closely with Ceredigion lifeguard supervisor, Tirion Dowsett, to plan scenarios for the teams to practice working together in casualty care situations.

A large scale scenario included four casualties to be dealt with by the inshore lifeboat crew and two lifeguard teams on a nearby beach, whilst a third lifeguard team and lifeboat crew members dealt with a separate scenario at the lifeboat station.

Pete said: “It was a great evening of training. We had 9 lifeguards and 13 lifeboat crew in attendance.

“The main scenario included casualties suffering from hypothermia and propeller injuries. A second scenario involved a mechanic suffering head injuries in the forepeak of the all-weather lifeboat and requiring extraction on a stretcher.

“On completion of these scenarios we all gathered back at the station where one of our senior crew members sprung a great act at being a diabetic having a hypo, and being suitably angry and aggressive.”

Roger Couch, New Quay RNLI’s Lifeboat Operations Manager, added: “It was great for our lifeboat crew members to work with the lifeguards as it builds a deeper understanding of each other’s roles and encourages teamwork between us. This is of great benefit when dealing with real life casualty care situations.”

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Coastguard rescues dog stuck on cliffs

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LAST TUESDAY (Aug 27), New Quay RNLI’s inshore D-class lifeboat, Audrey LJ, was tasked by Milford Haven Coastguard to assist the Coastguard with a dog stuck on the cliffs near New Quay.

The volunteer crew launched the inshore lifeboat at 1.50pm with four crew members on board and made their way south down the coast.

Brett Stones, New Quay RNLI’s helm said: “We located the dog on the cliffs by Castell Bach, near Cwmtydu. We stood by while the Coastguard team caught the animal. The dog was unharmed and safe with the Coastguard so we were stood down.

“However, while returning to station we were then tasked to a small vessel with engine failure. We towed the stricken boat with three people on board back to New Quay. We rehoused the inshore lifeboat and it was ready for service by 2.40pm.”

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New maintenance Lorries cut carbon emissions

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The Ground Maintenance Team has purchased three new lorries to support ground maintenance services in Ceredigion.

The new lorries will move Ceredigion County Council’s Ground Maintenance Service’s equipment to and from the grounds that they look after. The lorries will also take cut grass away for composting. This provides the most efficient way of maintaining the areas that the team is responsible for.

Councillor Dafydd Edwards is the Cabinet member responsible for Highways and Environmental Services together with Housing. He said: “The new vehicles replace ones which had provided excellent service for almost 20 years. They are fitted with Euro 6 engines which are considerably more efficient and better for the environment.”

The Grounds Maintenance Team is also incrementally introducing electric-powered mowers, blowers, hedge cutters and strimmers into its fleet. This equipment is better for the environment, is easier to use and causes less noise and vibration.

The new lorries support Ceredigion County Council’s commitment to be a net-zero carbon council by 2030.

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