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Residents of Borth encouraged to boycott circus

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‘A Jolly disgrace’: Protesters in Buckley boycotting Peter Jolly’s Circus

‘A Jolly disgrace’: Protesters in Buckley boycotting Peter Jolly’s Circus

ANIMAL DEFENDERS INTERNATIONAL (ADI) have called for Borth residents to boycott Peter Jolly’s Circus whilst it is in Ceredigion this month, as the circus is one of two remaining circuses that still feature wild animal acts. This is an outdated and barbaric practice that leads to suffering and is overwhelmingly opposed by the public. 

Jan Creamer, President of Animal Defenders International, said: “Animal Defenders International has repeatedly documented the suffering and abuse of wild animals in circuses. Circuses simply cannot meet the needs of wild animals in small, mobile accommodation. The government has promised a ban, but we’re asking people to vote with their feet – don’t go to a circus with animals.”

Many local authorities have already opted to ban the use of animals in circuses and the government has promised a nationwide ban.

Due to the constant state of travel and their temporary nature, circuses cannot provide animals with adequate facilities to keep them physically or psychologically healthy and evidence of the suffering endured by animals in circuses is well documented and scientifically established, proving that their well-being is always compromised.

ADI’s observations of Peter Jolly’s Circus at their winter quarters over the past year have shown that even when off the road, animals were confined inside barns in small pens. Some animals remained inside a crowded barn for more than 14 hours a day and on one occasion, for a continuous 40-hour period.

During extensive observations carried out by ADI using hidden cameras, show animals at Peter Jolly’s Circus in Shropshire all huddled in tiny spaces with no movement, and zebras, ponies, donkeys and camels are all kept together with bullying rife. The animals are tethered for at least 16 hours of the day while domesticated species such as goats are confined with a tiny concrete cell, only leaving the confines once during observation.

The minimum requirement of space for a wild animal, according to Defra, is just four metres by five metres; yet, ADI claim Jolly’s did not even provide this.

So far, 32 countries around the world have prohibited the use of animals in circuses, with England and Wales promising to ban wild animal acts.

The Federation of Veterinarians of Europe (FVE) concluded: “There is by no means the possibility that their [wild mammals in travelling circuses] physiological, mental and social requirements can adequately be met.”

The British Veterinary Association adds: “The welfare needs of non-domesticated, wild animals cannot be met in a travelling circus – in terms of housing or being able to express normal behaviour.”

As well as vets, the continued use of wild animals in circuses is widely opposed by animal welfare experts, animal protection groups, politicians and a huge majority of the public. In response to a consultation by Defra on the issue, 94.5% of respondents supported a ban.

Over 200 local authorities in the UK have prohibited wild or all animal acts on public land and opinion polls consistently show that the public remains overwhelmingly opposed to wild animal acts, with a high proportion against all animal acts.

Despite assurances from the circus industry that animals are well cared for, the physical and psychological health of animals in circuses is inevitably compromised. Animals in circuses can also be subjected to brutal training methods and violence – wherever ADI has conducted an undercover investigation in the UK and around the world, it has documented acts of abuse.

Animal circuses do nothing to teach people about the animals’ real needs and the way they live, and have no role to play in education or conservation.

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Accredited Archive status given to Ceredigion Archives

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RECENTLY Ceredigion Archives celebrated that the Archives has been awarded the Accredited Archive status. The Chairman of Ceredigion County Council, Councillor Lynford Thomas unveiled the ‘Accredited Archive Service’ plaque.

Archive Service Accreditation is the UK standard for archive services. Standards schemes and frameworks help archives to manage and improve their efficiency and effectiveness through external validation, and by identifying good practice.

Attendees were welcomed to the unveiling by Helen Palmer, County Archivist a Information and Records Manager. She thanked all that were involved in the development of the Ceredigion Archives, saying: “Thanks to the Archives and Records Management Team who have worked so hard for so long to make this service what it is today. I also give an extended thanks to the Council staff within other departments, including ICT and Technical Services, who have helped us realise our ambitions and helped towards our accreditation.”

Helen continued: “Thanks go to our donors, for their huge generosity in sharing precious documents with us, without whom our collections would lack content and variety. Thanks to our researchers who prove over and over again that what we do is meaningful, relevant and important.”

Ceredigion Archives is available for everyone to use; for personal research, for school projects, university degree work, academic research, and research for business purposes. Staff at the Archives can suggest appropriate lines of research, and provide advice and assistance in the use of the documents.

Councillor Dafydd Edwards, Cabinet member with responsibility for Finance, ICT and Customer Services said: “The Archives and Records Management Team have worked hard and their dedication has been reflected in this success and on behalf of the Council, I congratulate Helen and her team for the prestigious Accredited status given to Ceredigion Archives. The Archives has a fantastic collection of documents, preserved carefully, which are available for anyone wanting to come along to view.”

You can visit Ceredigion Archives’ website at https://archifdy-ceredigion.org.uk/ or follow ‘Archifdy Ceredigion Archives’ on Facebook.

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Police appeal following Aberystwyth RTC

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POLICE are investigating a road traffic collision which occurred at approximately 6.20pm on Wednesday, December 20, 2017.

A silver MG ZT, which had been reported as stolen, collided with another vehicle in Rhydybont, Aberystwyth.

The occupants of the MG walked away in the direction of Min Y Ddol.

Police would like to speak to the man in the image as he may have information that could assist the police investigation.

Anyone with information that can help officers with their investigation is asked to report it by calling 101. If you are deaf, hard of hearing or speech impaired text the non-emergency number on 07811 311 908.”

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Family pay tribute to Aberporth man

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THE FAMILY of Phillip Rasmussen, from Aberporth, who tragically died in Spain on April 1, have paid tribute to the 47-year-old.

They said: “We are devastated by the loss of Phillip, and he will be dearly missed by us all.

“Phillip was a loving husband to Elissa and father to Rhys, Beci and Dylan.

“He lived life to the full and will be remembered for his energy and passion towards all aspects of life. He was a keen sailor, cyclist and loved to travel.

“He began his professional career as a chartered accountant and spent the last ten years working as Chief Financial Officer for IQE plc, a role which he truly loved and made his own.

“We would like to thank everyone for their support at this difficult time. It has meant so much to the whole family.

“We would now like time to grieve and would ask to be given privacy in which to do so.”

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