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Aberaeron crowned winner

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lle-gorau-yng-nghymru-1ABERAERON, the picturesque seaside resort town on Wales’ west coast, has today (Oct 31) been crowned the winner in Wales’ Best Places competition.

The nationwide competition, organised by the Royal Town Planning Institute Cymru, celebrates the places protected, carefully planned or improved by the planning system for communities.

Nearly 5,500 people voted on a shortlist of 10 places, with Aberaeron emerging as the most popular place.

Tenby, the walled coastal town in the Pembrokeshire Coast National Park and Gower, the first Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty in Britain are second and third respectively.

Presenting the award to the Mayor of Aberaeron, RTPI President Phil Williams said: “Aberaeron is a truly deserving winner of the title – ‘Wales’ Best Place’. The impact of planning is obvious here as you walk through the town which has been carefully planned in the Georgian style around the harbour. Planners have been important guardians of this town’s character as it has changed over the last 200 years – from small fishing village, to a thriving trading port and ship building town to today’s bustling business centre and tourist hot spot. As a Welshman I’m proud to have shone a spotlight on the outstanding range of places in Wales that have been protected, carefully planned or improved by planners.”

Mayor of Aberaeron, Rhys Davies, said: “I am so pleased that Aberaeron has won this very special award by the RTPI. It is something the residents of Aberaeron can be proud of, a place we all care deeply about.

Aberaeron is a gem of a town, it’s beauty cannot fail to capture the hearts of visitors. It is one of the most photographed towns in the UK, yet maintaining Aberaeron as a popular visitor destination takes hard work and I would like to thank the business community and all our residents who maintain their properties so well, and which greatly benefits our tourist trade. We of course will make full use of the recognition we have been given by all who voted for us and by further promoting our town on a national and international stage, which not only benefits Aberaeron but Ceredigion as a whole.”

Peter Lloyd, Chair of RTPI Cymru said: “Congratulations Aberaeron, affectionately known as the ‘Jewel of Cardigan Bay’. It’s no surprise this charming seaside town, dotted with brightly coloured cottages around the harbour is the public’s favourite. This competition has reminded us just how important planners and the planning system are in ensuring places are protected, shaped and improved.

Aberaeron is one of Wales’ first planned towns and since then has been developed and managed by the planning system to be a popular tourist destination and providing services to communities in its large rural hinterland. The planning of the town by Colonel Alban Gwynne and architect, Edward Haycock, earned it the reputation of being “one of the best examples of a planned township of small scale in Wales”.

Councillor Elizabeth Evans, County Councillor for Aberaeron Ward said, “I am delighted that Aberaeron has won the RTPI Wales’ Best Places award. We were in a very tough shortlist of great places, which makes the winning all the more special. I would like to thank everyone who voted for our beautiful town and I know that the residents of Aberaeron will be as proud as I am, that our town has received this award. We of course have to thank the Rev Alban Gwynne, the man who made it all possible back in 1807, for having the vision to plan such a lovely place. Today, we are merely custodians of his legacy; this great town, Aberaeron.”

The 10 finalists are: Aberaeron, (Ceredigion); Caernarfon (Gwynedd); Cardiff Bay Inner Harbour, (Cardiff); Denbigh, (Denbighshire); Gower, (Swansea); The Hayes, (Cardiff); Llandudno Promenade and Mostyn Street, (Conwy); Merthyr Tydfil Town Centre, (Merthyr Tydfil); Snowdonia, (Snowdonia National Park) and Tenby, (Pembrokeshire Coast National Park).

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Second workshop held on Ceredigion’s Economic Future

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A SECOND workshop was held on July 9 for County Councillors to discuss Ceredigion’s economic future bringing together some of the county’s biggest organisations to share what they had to offer and what partnership working between businesses and Ceredigion County Council could look like in the future.

The Workshop was an opportunity to hear from the large businesses that operate in Ceredigion. Environment Systems, MicroPharm and Rachel’s Dairy gave an insight into their businesses and about future investment opportunities.

The Workshops are an essential component of engaging with businesses as the Council begins to make preparations for a Growth Deal for the region which, if successful, will provide a major boost to the economy, job prospects and the prosperity of the area.

Councillor Ellen ap Gwynn, Leader of Ceredigion County Council and Vice-Chair of the Growing Mid Wales Partnership, said: “I hope that holding this second Economic Future Workshop shows that we continue to meet and support businesses. These businesses are key in keeping our young people in the county, providing a variety of different jobs and developing their skills and continuous learning for their future in West Wales.”

A third Workshop will be held in the near future which will provide a flavour of possible projects for a Growth Deal.

The Growth Deal will be prepared between Ceredigion and Powys County Councils, working with the Welsh and UK Government.

A Joint Agreement between Ceredigion and Powys is also being prepared for agreement in the Autumn to take this work forward.

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Lucy’s Law gets support from AMs

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AN EVENT calling for the introduction of ‘Lucy’s Law’ was held in the Senedd last Wednesday (Jul 11).

Assembly Members Eluned Morgan and Vikki Howells sponsored the event in support of an immediate ban on the sale of puppies by pet shops and other third-party commercial dealers, in response to growing concerns from animal charities that not enough is being done to prevent illegal breeding and animal cruelty.

The sale of puppies through commercial third-party dealers both sustains and is dependent upon the existence of ‘puppy farms’, where puppies are bred for maximum profit and with minimal regard for animal welfare.

Although very few high street pet shops sell puppies these days, the third-party trade remains significant across the UK with dealers operating from a diverse array of premises including private homes and puppy superstores. Evidence suggests that the trade sources puppies bred in Wales.

According to animal charity, CARIAD, a ban is the essential first step towards ending the practice of farming dogs for profit with little or no regard for their welfare or their fitness as family companions. Stress, increased risk of disease, poor breeding practices and irresponsible selling tactics are all associated with the method of third-party puppy selling.

Respected Vet and campaigner Marc Abraham spoke during the event at the National Assembly for Wales, he said:
“It simply isn’t enough to license puppy sellers, we must have a full and complete ban, to stop the trade and supply of dogs bred on such an extensive scale. Lucy’s Law will help to change the way dogs are bred in this country. It will make the process more transparent and raise standards, improving the economy and employment opportunities. This is a revolution in dog breeding and it will do wonders for the reputation of Wales as a responsible dog breeding nation.”

Eluned Morgan AM said: “There are many documented cases of puppy farming, particularly in the region I represent. Puppy smuggling is also an issue with several reported cases of puppies entering our ports from Ireland. The adoption of Lucy’s Law in Wales sends a strong message that as a nation we expect the highest animal welfare practises and that the cruel act of puppy farming can be consigned to history. I want us to be ambitious and to take the lead on this legislation which I hope will be a real possibility following this event in the Senedd.”

Vikki Howells AM said: “I am pleased to be jointly hosting this event today with important contributions from Pup Aid and CARIAD and Marc the vet who has done so much to raise awareness of Lucy’s Law across the United Kingdom and now here in Wales too.”

Legislation relating to Lucy’s Law is devolved to the Welsh Government under the 1956 An

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Views sought on proposed Ceredigion Language Strategy

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VIEWS are being sought on the proposed Ceredigion Language Strategy 2018-2023.

Ceredigion County Council’s proposed strategy sets out how the Council – working in collaboration with other partner organisations – will actively promote the Welsh language and facilitate the use of Welsh more widely within the local area.

Producing the Strategy is one of the requirements of the Welsh Language Standards in accordance with the Welsh Language Measure (Wales) 2011.

The Ceredigion Language Strategy aims to sustain and to promote the Welsh language in all aspects of life and to demonstrate ways of strengthening social networks in a bilingual area. Ceredigion remains a stronghold of the Welsh language however communities are changing which can affect the Welsh language and culture. Responding to these challenges, mitigating the risks facing the Welsh language and securing the viability of welsh-speaking communities requires robust language planning, alongside taking positive action in all aspects of social and economic life within the county.

The Leader of the Council and Cabinet Member with responsibility for Welsh Language Standards, Councillor Ellen ap Gwynn, said: “In implementing this strategy, Ceredigion will be contributing towards the Welsh Government vision in its Welsh Language Strategy, which aims to reach a million Welsh speakers in Wales by 2050. This strategy is an opportunity for us to work across the county to increase the use of Welsh language and to ensure that it reaches those parts of public life where it may be less prominent at present. This vision is to maintain a truly bilingual Ceredigion, where the Welsh language can be seen and heard every day in communities as a natural means of communication.”

The strategy is designed to be as realistic and proactive as possible in order to contribute to the vision of a truly bilingual Ceredigion, however the actions identified are within the sphere of influence of organisations working in partnership through the Ceredigion Bilingual Futures Forum.

Councillor ap Gwynn continued: “We are inviting you to comment on the proposed Strategy and the identified actions to be delivered in Ceredigion. We value your opinion, and your comments will be taken into account when publishing the final Strategy.”

Closing date for the consultation is August 13, 2018.

To view the proposed strategy, visit the Consultation page on the Council’s website, www.ceredigion.gov.uk/

Individuals are welcome to contact the Council on 01545 570881 should they wish to receive further information or to receive the information in another format. You can also obtain a paper copy of the Strategy at any of the Council’s Public Offices or Libraries.

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