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29% of tyres replaced in Wales are already illegal

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screen-shot-2016-11-29-at-12-23-12A RECENT survey, compiled by TyreSafe, of over 25,000 tyres as they were being replaced at Welsh tyre outlets, showed that 29.1% were illegal.

October has been Tyre Safety Month, and Road Safety Wales Partners have been highlighting the importance of tyres to safer motoring through social media. It has been disappointing to note that two recent police campaigns highlighted problems with tyres on a number of vehicles. Drivers who fail to comply with the regulations face a fine of up to £2,500 and three penalty points for each illegal tyre. Leaving your tyre checks until the MOT is due could be an expensive decision.

Motorists can help reduce the risks to themselves and other road users by carrying out tyre checks every month and before long journeys. The air pressure in each tyre should follow the vehicle manu facturer’s recommended settings, and tread depth should be well over the minimum legal limit of 1.6mm, roughly the same as the rim of a 20p piece. If a 20p piece is inserted into the tread and the rim is visible, the tyre may be illegal. However, professional advice is to replace your tyres ideally as soon as they reach 3mm. While checking tread depth, also look out for any lumps, bumps, signs of ageing or scuffing on the tyre which may indicate internal damage.

As the winter weather begins to take a hold on the country, adequate tread depth is essential for good grip, especially on wet roads where the tread pattern helps to remove water from between the tyre and the road surface. Drivers with insufficient tread depth face longer stopping distances, reduced grip and an increased risk of aquaplaning.

Road Safety Wales has recently lent its support to TyreSafe, the UK’s charity dedicated to raising awareness of the importance of correct tyre maintenance and the dangers of defective and illegal tyres. All Partners in Road Safety Wales are committed to reducing the number of people killed and seriously injured on the roads of Wales, and are pleased to be working with TyreSafe to raise awareness of the preventative steps road users can take to stay safe.

Susan Storch, Chair of Road Safety Wales, said: “Every day on Welsh roads, people are taking chances with their lives by driving defective vehicles. During the winter period, it is more important than ever that vehicles are roadworthy, legal and safe. Don’t forget that your tyres are the only parts of the vehicle which are in contact with the road, and safety in acceleration, braking, steering and cornering all depend on a relatively small area of road contact. Correct tyre maintenance and care is critical for your safety, no matter what type of vehicle you are driving.”

Stuart Jackson, Chairman of TyreSafe, said: “TyreSafe’s tread depth survey highlighted the poor attitude towards tyre safety among Britain’s motorists, and Wales actually recorded worse results than the national average. While the need to carry out many of the maintenance checks has decreased as vehicles have become more reliable, tyres are in direct contact with the road and can be damaged, lose pressure or wear between service intervals or MOTs. The only way to be sure your tyres are roadworthy is to check them at least once a month and before long journeys. That’s why this year’s Tyre Safety Month message of ‘Don’t chance it, check it’ is relevant all year round.”

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Another man charged in Ifan Owens assault case

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Ifan Owens: Seriously assaulted in January

ANOTHER man has been charged and remanded into custody in relation to the serious assault of Ifan Owens, aged 19, in Aberystwyth on January 14.

Michael Arwyn Jones, 24, has been charged with S18 Grievous Bodily Harm with Intent and Possession of Cannabis.

Last week, Billy Valentine, 19, of Terrace Road, Aberystwyth, and David Lloyd, 25, of no fixed abode, entered no pleas when they appeared at Haverfordwest Magistrates’ Court.

The pair were sent to trial at Swansea Crown Court on May 11 at 10am.

Due to the serious nature of the offence, Lloyd’s bail was revoked.

The court found there was a real risk he would abscond or re-offend.

As well as being charged with grievous bodily harm, he was also charged with having a blade exceeding 3 inches in a public place without good reason or lawful authority.

Valentine was also charged with being in possession of herbal cannabis as the time of his arrest. This was by Magistrates, who gave him a 12 month conditional discharge, and ordered him to pay £20 to fund the victims of crime, and £85 to the Crown Prosecution Service.

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Consultation to launch today on future of health services in Ceredigion

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HYWEL DDA UNIVERSITY HEALTH BOARD are formally announcing the launch of their consultation at County Hall in Haverfordwest this morning (Apr 19).

The proposals, the Board say, will shape the future provision of health and care services to the general population.

These provisions will be ‘safe, viable and offer an improvement to what is currently provided’.

The Herald will be attending the event, which starts at 9:30am.

You can watch a live stream here.

The 12-week consultation, which is clinically-led, will involve a number of events for communities, both general and targeted, as well as an awareness raising campaign.

It is expected that the announcements will have big changes for Withbyush, Glangwili, Prince Philip and Bronglais hospitals.

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Issue of lifeboats raised to Prime Minister

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BEN LAKE MP made his Prime Minister’s Questions debut, raising the important issue of the future of Cardigan Bay’s lifeboat provision.

On Thursday (Apr 18) Mr Lake commended the valiant efforts of RNLI staff and volunteers at New Quay lifeboat station who have been safeguarding those who venture out into the bay, be it for work or pleasure, since 1864.

He also expressed concern at the possibility that there will no longer be an all-weather lifeboat in Ceredigion from 2020.

Mr Lake asked the Prime Minister whether she would agree ‘that the invaluable work of the RNLI serves as a fourth emergency service, and that as such it is essential the coastline of Ceredigion, like every other populated coastline, has access to this service whatever the weather?’

The Prime Minister responded: “Search and rescue at sea is provided by several organisations, including the coastguard and the RNLI. The RNLI has a proud tradition, and we should be grateful for its record on search and rescue at sea. It is obviously independent and decides where best to put its resources, but we are supporting the work of independent lifeboat charities through our Rescue Boat Grant Fund, which has allocated more than £3.5 million since 2014 to increase capacity and resilience by providing new boats and equipment.”

Ben Lake said: “I was glad of the opportunity to raise an issue that is of great concern to communities across Ceredigion with the Prime Minister. I look forward to working with the RNLI and campaign representatives in search of a long-term solution, and in particular seek to ascertain whether the Rescue Boat Grant Fund could be of benefit to ensuring the retention of an all-weather lifeboat at New Quay.”

The RNLI has decided to downgrade New Quay Lifeboat Station to an Inshore Lifeboat when the service life of its Mersey-class All-Weather Lifeboat expires in 2020.

The proposed new lifeboat will not be able to launch in conditions exceeding Force 7 in the daytime or Force 6 at night.

After 2020, there will be no All-Weather Lifeboats in the whole of Ceredigion, leaving a gap of 70 miles between the All-Weather stations of Barmouth and Fishguard.

The latest generation of All-Weather Lifeboats can travel at 25 knots in 30 minutes in calm conditions. In a challenging sea, the nearest boats at Barmouth and Fishguard would take more than an hour and a half to respond to an emergency off New Quay or Aberaeron.

The mission statement of the RNLI reads: “Our crews aim to launch their lifeboats with 10 minutes of being notified and can operate up to 100 nautical miles out at sea. We aim to reach at least 90% of all casualties within 10 nautical miles of the coast within 30 minutes of a lifeboat launch – any weather.”

The Ceredigion Lifeboat Campaign are questioning how local rescues can take place in a challenging sea to meet this aim of the RNLI. Over 10,000 have currently signed a petition campaigning against the proposed changes.

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