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Judgement reserved on Herald ​editor

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Barrister Matthew Paul: Pictured with Herald editor Thomas Sinclair​

THE EDITOR of The Ceredigion Herald appeared in court today (Apr 20) charged with breaching a statutory reporting restriction.

Thomas Hutton Sinclair, the 37-year-old editor of the Herald titles, was on trial for allegedly identifying the complainant in a sexual offence case.

Appearing in Llanelli Magistrates’ Court, Mr Sinclair maintained his not guilty plea.

Prosecuting, Emma Myles told the court that the allegation related to an article published in the Ceredigion Herald in 2016.

“The court will be aware that under the provision of the 1992 sexual offences act the complainant has a right to anonymity,” Ms Myles said.

“It is the Crown’s submission that this falls foul of the wording of this act.”

All written statements were accepted by the defence, and the case hinged on whether the article in question breached the Act in question or not.

The court heard from the record of a police interview with Herald deputy editor Jon Coles, in which he stated that he had received the court report in question from a Herald court reporter, and changed the tense from present to past, as well as fixing some errors.

Describing M​r​ Sinclair as ‘a hands-on editor’, he added that Mr Sinclair had the final word over what was published. Mr Coles stated that in this instance he had not been instructed to check whether the content complied with the law, though on some occasions he carried out this task when asked.

In an informal interview last year, Mr Sinclair told police that he had held the role of editor since 2013, although his training was in law not journalism.

He added that as a total of around 1,200 articles were published over the four titles each week, it was ‘impossible’ to edit all of them, and some of this work was referred to the deputy editor. In this case he had not seen the article until it was brought to his attention by the police.

When asked his opinion on whether the article breached reporting restrictions, Mr Sinclair replied that it ‘sailed close to the wind’ but would not allow members of the public in general to identify the complainant.

He pointed out that the defendant in the original case had ‘a common surname’ and that The Herald had not reproduced his address.

When asked if he would have changed anything had he edited the article himself, Mr Sinclair suggested that he may have taken out details of the defendant’s occupation.

However, he maintained that ‘any member of the general public would not be able to piece together who the complainant is’.

He also noted that the reporter who wrote the article had just been coming to the end of a probationary period at the time, and that his staff had already been booked onto a media law course.

Summing up, Ms Myles said that it was the Crown’s submission that by publishing this article, Mr Sinclair had breached legislation specifically aimed at that type of case.

“I respectfully submit that the legislation must be stringently applied,” she added, stating that details of the relationship between the complainant and the defendant in the original case which were published breached the legislation.

Representing Mr Sinclair, Matthew Paul set out the information revealed in the article – the name, age and former occupation of the convicted party, along with the date of conviction and a familial relationship which had existed at some point between him and the complainant. However, he noted that the date of the offence and the defendant’s address had not been included, and no indication had been given as to the age of the complainant.

His argument was that in this case there was nothing in the article which would allow any member of the public not closely connected with the convicted party or the complainant to make any identification.

Mr Paul stressed that for a conviction, it had to be demonstrated that there was a real, rather than a hypothetical risk of identification.

Referring to the case of the Attorney General vs Greater Manchester Newspaper Group he noted that it had been found that the risk of identification was not based on relative statistical probability but ‘a real risk’.

“The Crown has to establish more than a hypothetical, but a material risk,” he added.

Mr Paul noted that the Crown appeared to be of the position that placing the complainant in a ‘pool of potential victims’ was the same as identifying them.

“Identifying, in my submission, must mean only one thing; it must lead to one person.”

Mr Paul added that the familial relationship mentioned could apply to more than one person, and that there was nothing in the report which suggested whether it was an historical or recent offence.

He suggested that the most the article could lead to, if read by someone familiar with the convicted party and/ or complainant, would be to place them in a ‘small pool’ of potential people.

He also noted that this small risk of identification was made even smaller by the Ceredigion Herald’s circulation figures at this time, which amounted to a relatively small percentage of the county buying a copy, and the fact that the story was not placed online.

“Right from the start you are dealing with a low-level risk, made even smaller by the fact that the date of the offence was not mentioned,” he added.

“Overall, you are looking at whether this report would lead members of the public to identify the complainant – it is my submission that it would not.”

District Judge David Parsons reserved judgement until May 12 at Llanelli Magistrates’ Court.

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Llandysul farmers plead guilty

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LAST week, Mr David Davies and Mr Meirion Davies, both of Penffynnon Farm, Bangor Teifi, Llandysul, appeared before the Magistrates Court at Aberystwyth, charged with Animal Health related offences.

Both men pleaded guilty to all charges.

The charges consisted of 13 charges relating to causing unnecessary suffering to cattle, failing to meet animal needs, and charges of failure to dispose of animal by-products; namely the carcasses found on the farm.

The case follows an investigation by Ceredigion County Council Animal Health Officers. When officers visited the farm, they discovered a large number of cattle carcasses in varying states of decay in several locations.

The remaining cattle were also found to be kept in poor conditions and have since been subject to regular surveillance.

The case has been adjourned to mid-February to enable pre-sentence reports to be prepared.

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New Quay: RNLI receives donation from local couple

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LINDA and Tony Miles from Llandysul recently donated a sum of money to New Quay Lifeboat Station on behalf of their grandson.

Being former members of Teifi Boating Club in Gwbert, their grandson Robert had asked for his Christmas present money to go to the RNLI at New Quay.

On receiving the donation Roger Couch, New Quay RNLI’s Lifeboat Operations Manager said “We would like to thank Robert for his kind thoughts and generosity. Donating money to New Quay Lifeboat Station ensures we can carry on with our lifesaving work in Cardigan Bay.”

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Ten years for baby abusing paedophile who handed himself in to police

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A LLANILAR man who confessed to child sex offences no-one was aware of was jailed for 10 years on Friday (Jan 18).

Jared Perry, aged 32, walked into Aberystwyth police station and told officers he had sexually assaulted seven children, three of them when they were babies.

Perry, of Talardeg, was told by Judge Paul Thomas that he was a dangerous offender as defined by law and would be on licence and liable to be recalled to prison until 2035.

John Hipkin, prosecuting, told Swansea Crown Court that he made members of his family aware that he had committed child sex offences.

Perry promised “to change” but went on to sexually assault more children.

Judge Paul Thomas said those who were aware of Perry’s offending would have to live with their decision not to inform the police.

Eventually Perry’s conscience got the better of him and he made full admissions to the police.

Mr Hipkin said the prosecution had to accept that there was no evidence of his offending apart from his confession.

He said one of Perry’s victims was a two month old baby.

Mr Hipkin said some of the assaults happened when Perry was about 16. There was then a gap before a second spate of offences when he was aged between 26 and 29.

Perry’s barrister, Dean Pulling, said he had been brought up in a deeply religious environment and had been driven by his conscience to confess.

Perry admitted 10 offences of indecent assault and sexual assault on children aged under 13.

Judge Thomas said there were aspects of the case that were unique to the point of being bizarre.

“The evidence comes solely from your own admissions.

“One truly shocking aspect is that after those first offences you told members of your family.

“For reasons known best only to them, and which they will have to live with, they did not inform the police.

“No doubt they gave you a chance because you promised to change. But you did not. You were unable to prevent yourself from re-offending.”

Judge Thomas said he was in no doubt whatsoever that Perry posed an extremely high risk of sexually harming children in the future.

Perry was made the subject of a Sexual Harm Prevention Order and told to register with the police as a sex offender, both orders to run for the rest of his life.

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