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St David’s Day celebrations set for success

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CERED, Ceredigion’s Welsh Language initiative, will be busy between March 1-4 with events to celebrate St David’s Day in Aberystwyth and Lampeter.

In Lampeter, a parade will be held on Friday, March 2 and hundreds of local residents of all ages are expected to march through the streets of the town, waving flags to the sound of welcoming Welsh music. Amongst the marchers will be schools, societies, clubs and members of the district churches. All the schools and societies have been asked to display their organisations’ flags and wear the traditional Welsh costume or something red.

The parade will begin at 12:45pm at Ysgol Bro Pedr and finish with a special seremony in the Orsedd park where Ben Lake MP, Elin Jones AM and Lampeter Town Council will greet the marchers. The entertainment will consist of speakers, Cwmann and District Choir and an ensemble from Ysgol Bro Pedr. Following the parade, there will be a dance session with Sally Saunders and Sioned Rees for Year 5 and 6 pupils of the district.

Owain Llŷr, Cered’s Senior Development Officer, explained how the plan to hold a parade was developed: “During 2017, Cered held focus groups as part of the Pwerdy Iaith Lampeter and District plan in order to assess the situation of the Welsh Language in the district and think about projects to develop that would boost the language locally. One of the ideas discussed was to establish a St David’s parade through the town by following similar examples in towns such as Aberystwyth and Carmarthen who’ve developed similar parades over the last years. Following on from the focus groups, members of Lampeter Town Council arranged a committee to go ahead and organise the parade. Cered has supported this work as part of its community work initiative.”

As part of the celebrations in Lampeter, all of the town’s café’s will offer Welsh food on St David’s day itself, March 1. A competition is held for the town’s businessess for the best decorated shop window. The winning business will receive a prize donated by the Town Council.

To close the celebrations, a gig will be held on Saturday, March 3, with Fleur de Lys, Mei Emrys a’r Band, Bwca and Ysgol Bro Pedr DJs performing. Tickets can be bought for £8 in advance by contacting Cered on 01545 572350 or email cered@ceredigion.gov.uk and £10 at the door.

The parade is being sponsored by Lampeter Town Council, Cered, LAS, University of Wales Trinity Saint David, W. D. Lewis, Lampeter Rotary Club, Pedr and Lampeter Lunch Club.

As well as playing a leading role in organising the Lampeter St David’s Day celebrations, Cered has also been busy organising special activities in Aberystwyth. On Saturday, March3, Cered will be holding a day of Welsh activities and entertainment for all the family as part of the Aberystwyth Festival Parade day. ‘Cered on the Prom’ will take place between 9.30am and 4pm at the Bandstand and includes a performance by the Welsh Whisperer, the hugely popular entertainer at 2pm.

There will be bands performing from some of the district’s primary schools who have been taking part in composing pop song workshops with Steff Rees from Bwca, also a Community Development Officer for Cered. A number of workshops will be held, all free to attend. Artist Meinir Mathias will be leading an art workshop, a story session for babies, a costume creating workshop with Arad Goch and a children’s clogging workshop with Tasgu.

Ceredigion County Council Leader, Councillor Ellen ap Gwynn said: “The Council is proud to support Cered, who is working hard to influence and develop the use of the Welsh language in Ceredigion. Through events organised such as these, everyone who loves Wales and wants Wales to flourish, whatever their background, can have a chance to celebrate and enjoy St David’s Day together.”

If you would like more information about these events or for the wider work of Cered, like their Facebook page @ceredmenteriaith, follow them on Twitter, @MICered, or visit their website at www.cered.wales.

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Views sought on proposed Ceredigion Language Strategy

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VIEWS are being sought on the proposed Ceredigion Language Strategy 2018-2023.

Ceredigion County Council’s proposed strategy sets out how the Council – working in collaboration with other partner organisations – will actively promote the Welsh language and facilitate the use of Welsh more widely within the local area.

Producing the Strategy is one of the requirements of the Welsh Language Standards in accordance with the Welsh Language Measure (Wales) 2011.

The Ceredigion Language Strategy aims to sustain and to promote the Welsh language in all aspects of life and to demonstrate ways of strengthening social networks in a bilingual area. Ceredigion remains a stronghold of the Welsh language however communities are changing which can affect the Welsh language and culture. Responding to these challenges, mitigating the risks facing the Welsh language and securing the viability of welsh-speaking communities requires robust language planning, alongside taking positive action in all aspects of social and economic life within the county.

The Leader of the Council and Cabinet Member with responsibility for Welsh Language Standards, Councillor Ellen ap Gwynn, said: “In implementing this strategy, Ceredigion will be contributing towards the Welsh Government vision in its Welsh Language Strategy, which aims to reach a million Welsh speakers in Wales by 2050. This strategy is an opportunity for us to work across the county to increase the use of Welsh language and to ensure that it reaches those parts of public life where it may be less prominent at present. This vision is to maintain a truly bilingual Ceredigion, where the Welsh language can be seen and heard every day in communities as a natural means of communication.”

The strategy is designed to be as realistic and proactive as possible in order to contribute to the vision of a truly bilingual Ceredigion, however the actions identified are within the sphere of influence of organisations working in partnership through the Ceredigion Bilingual Futures Forum.

Councillor ap Gwynn continued: “We are inviting you to comment on the proposed Strategy and the identified actions to be delivered in Ceredigion. We value your opinion, and your comments will be taken into account when publishing the final Strategy.”

Closing date for the consultation is August 13, 2018.

To view the proposed strategy, visit the Consultation page on the Council’s website, www.ceredigion.gov.uk/

Individuals are welcome to contact the Council on 01545 570881 should they wish to receive further information or to receive the information in another format. You can also obtain a paper copy of the Strategy at any of the Council’s Public Offices or Libraries.

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Archaeological sites revealed in drought

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Iron Age farm near Whitland (pic. RCAHMW)

AN AERIAL ARCHAEOLOGIST has photographed ancient settlements from the air after the heatwave has revealed outlines as crop marks.

Dr Toby Driver, Senior Aerial Investigator, uses a light aircraft to find sites, flying from Haverfordwest Airport with stopovers made for fuel at Caernarfon, Welshpool or even Gloucester airports.

The Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales (RCAHMW) has released photographs from Dr Driver’s discoveries.

Iron Age farmsteads has been discovered near Whitland in Carmarthenshire and coastal Ceredigion. The Llŷn peninsula has extensive crop marks of prehistoric enclosures, as well as a Bronze Age barrow cemetery.

In Gwynedd, another Celtic settlement has been found on the valley floor between the hillfort Craig yr Aderyn and the castle ruins of Castell y Bere.

A suspected Roman watchtower was also revealed on the nearby coast. Parch marks of Roman buildings are showing at Caerhun Roman fort in Conwy Valley, whilst crop marks of a prehistoric enclosure and a suspected Roman villa were found in the Vale of Glamorgan.

Iron Age farmstead in Ceredigion (pic. RCAHMW)

A Roman town and fortress between Caerwent and Caerleon have also appeared in the dry conditions.

Dr Driver said: “I’ve not seen conditions like this since I took over the archaeological flying at the Royal Commission in 1997. So much new archaeology is showing it is incredible; the urgent work in the air now will lead to months of research in the office in the winter months to map and record all the sites which have been seen, and reveal their true significance.”

The marks are the result of vegetation feeding on better nutrients and water supplies, that have been trapped in the old fortification ditches.

This leads to the lush green growth that results in the pronounced outlines of the prior settlements.

Despite this, the vegetation can quickly retreat as the weather changes.

This research is expected to prompt further research on the ground in the future.

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Welsh Water advises customers to use water wisely

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WELSH WATER is encouraging its three million customers to continue working with the company by using water wisely – even though it may soon start to rain. After such prolonged dry weather, it will be difficult for any rain to penetrate the ground and help restore reservoir levels.

The company – which provides drinking water to most of Wales, Herefordshire and parts of Deeside – is safeguarding water supplies following the hottest June in Wales since records began in 1910.

It has been proactively taking measures for the last two months to prepare for the hot weather, with 450 colleagues finding and repairing leaks and its 62 water treatment works being manned 24 hours a day to help supply a record 1 billion litres a day.

The company confirmed that a few of its 87 reservoirs are now lower than usual at this time of year but said this is to be expected given the prolonged dry weather. It will take some time for these reservoirs to recover to their normal levels, despite the expected rain over the next week.

Managing Director of Water Services Ian Christie, said: “Over the last few months, we have taken and will continue to take all the necessary actions to ensure there is enough water in our network during this very dry period.   We’ve done a lot of groundwork in the background to prepare for this weather and still doing everything we can to safeguard supplies. This includes finding and fixing leaks and putting more water in the network every day than ever before.

“It’s really important that our customers continue to work with us during this period. If they spot a leak, please let us know. We’re also asking them to think about how much water they are using.

We want everyone to stay safe and drink water while it’s hot but we’re reminding everyone of the need to use water wisely and efficiently.

“Customers may notice that some reservoir levels are lower than usual but this isn’t a surprise given this continuing dry weather.  We are all using more water and we’re putting 20% more water into the system. This is helping us meet higher demand in particular communities. We are also using our own fleet of over 30 tankers to help.

“Even if the weather starts to turn and it rains, it’s important that customers continue to work with us and use any water efficiently.  Customers can get advice on our top ten tips of how to use water efficiently around the home and garden from our website, dwrcymru.com

Customers can also help by reporting any leaks as soon as they notice them either through our website or by calling our leak line on 0800 052 0130. Our teams are out and about working around the clock fixing leaks on the network to make sure as much water as possible is available for customers to use.

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