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Aber research sheds new light on Churchill

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AN ABERYSTWYTH academic has jointly authored an article which details the marital infidelity of wartime leader Winston Churchill and sheds light on the way in which Churchill’s reputation and image have been carefully burnished and polished by those keen to present a myth rather than a complete human story.

Dr Warren Dockter is a Lecturer in the Department of International Politics at Aberystwyth University. He is the author of Churchill and the Islamic World: Orientalism, Empire and Diplomacy in the Middle East and editor of Winston Churchill at the Telegraph.

Winston Churchill had a short affair with the dazzling socialite Lady Doris Castlerosse in the 1930s, according to his former private secretary.

A recording by Churchill’s former private secretary, Jock Colville, in which he disclosed that Britain’s war leader had engaged in a short affair with the society beauty in the South of France, has been revealed by Dr Warren Dockter of Aberystwyth University and Professor Richard Toye, Head of History at the University of Exeter.

Colville, a close confidant and trusted aide of Churchill, said in the taped 1985 interview for Churchill College, Cambridge, that the story that he had to tell was rather scandalous and that he did not want it disclosed for a long time to come.

He revealed that when he visited Winston and his wife Clementine in the late 1950s, Churchill’s literary assistant Denis Kelly had presented Clementine with a set of love-letters from Lady Castlerosse. Clementine Churchill, he recounted, read the correspondence and turned pale.

According to Colville, Clementine was anxious about the episode for months and told him she had never previously thought that Winston had been unfaithful to her.

The research, to be published in the journal in the Journal of Contemporary History – and featured in the Channel 4 documentary Secret History– includes testimony from Castlerosse’s niece, Caroline Delevingne, who disclosed that her family had known about the affair.

Documents in the family’s possession include – in addition to photos of Churchill and Lady Castlerosse together – a long and affectionate 1934 letter in which he compared her to a ray of sunshine.

Churchill apparently carried out the affair in the 1930s when he had four holidays in the south of France he took unaccompanied by his wife Clementine. He painted at least two portraits of the renowned society beauty – which were removed by Churchill’s friend the Press Baron, Lord Beaverbrook, after her death from an overdose of sleeping pills at the Dorchester Hotel in 1942.

From an ordinary suburban upbringing in Beckenham, South East London, Doris, Viscountess Castlerosse, became a notorious society figure, with a string of wealthy lovers. Tall, blonde and vivacious, she is said to have been the model for the fast young widow Iris Storm in Michael Arlen’s The Green Hat and, later, for the tempestuous temptress Amanda in Noel Coward’s Private Lives.

She married Valentine Castlerosse, a spend-thrift Viscount and gossip columnist, but they divorced after he apparently hired private eyes to follow his wife and report on her infidelities.

The research also cites papers of President Roosevelt’s right-hand man Harry Hopkins which show that at the height of World War 2, Churchill pulled strings to get Doris a hard-to-obtain airplane passage so that she could travel back to Britain from America.

Dr Dockter said: “This revelation about Churchill’s private life helps us locate the man inside the myth and reveals a more complete and nuanced understanding of his character. Beyond his relationship with Doris Castlerosse, the academic article for the Journal of Contemporary History further illuminates how Churchillian networks have curated Churchill’s memory.”

Professor Richard Toye, Head of History at Exeter University and who has written three books on Churchill, said the research provided a fuller picture of a little-known episode in Churchill’s life, and shed new light on his character.

“Although this doesn’t radically change our view of Churchill as a leader, it does give us a more complete view of his character and his marriage. The received wisdom is that he never strayed and that he and Clementine were devoted to one another. In fact, Clementine loathed the Riviera Set with whom he liked to spend his summers, and saw them as a bad influence on him.”

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Education

Into the Looking Glass

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Selfie culture: Becoming one with the screen

A FILM about the future of selfie culture produced by two Aberystwyth University’s media lecturers has been shortlisted for the British Universities Film & Video Council’s Learning on Screen Awards 2018.

Into the Looking Glass​ ​- how selfie culture is preparing us to meet our future selves​ -​ has been produced by Dr Greg Bevan and Dr Glen Creeber from the University’s Department of Theatre, Film & Television Studies.

The 24​ ​minute video essay takes a close look at the future development of selfie culture and its proliferation via smart technology.

The British Universities Film & Video Council’s Learning on Screen is a charity whose members are experts in the use of moving image in education, delivering online academic databases, on demand video resources, training, information and advice.

Dr Bevan said: “Video essays as academic outputs are still a fairly new idea. It’s a way of engaging with your audience more imaginatively, and also of introducing theories and concepts to new and non-academic audiences who might never ordinarily read a journal article.

“We also hope the video essay will be a useful teaching aid in the fields of digital media, digital culture, media and communications, and beyond​.”​

The film explores the idea that the screen is coming increasingly nearer to the viewer – from the village cinema to the living room. Now it is carried in the form of a tablet or phone; but what lies beyond the likes of VR sets and smart watches? Could eye and brain implants lead to the screen disappearing altogether? Will the viewer eventually become one with the screen?

Dr Creeber said: “The ideas explored in this film affect almost everybody in society today, and in future societies. Not only is the screen coming physically nearer, but we are increasingly seeing ourselves reflected in it.

“We are no longer passive spectators watching the screen from a distance; we are now active participants. Rather than taking a typically pessimistic view of this technological change, the film suggests some ways in which these developments could in fact be of benefit to humanity.”

The original score for the film was composed by Dr Alan Chamberlain, a Senior Research Fellow at the Mixed Reality Lab, Department of Computer Science at the University of Nottingham.

Dr Alan Chamberlain said: “It’s exciting to see the importance of this collaboration being recognised at a national level and nominated for an award. Working with Aberystwyth University has allowed us to show the impact that cross-disciplinary research across universities can have.

“This project brings together the Arts and Sciences in a way that it is both interesting and innovative. Aberystwyth University is one of the creative powerhouses in the academic landscape of Wales and it’s been a great experience to work with people there, we’re already working on our next project.”

The winners will be announced at an awards ceremony at the BFI Southbank, London on April 26.

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Education

Lampeter Masterclasses open for all

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Lifelong learning: Lampeter offers the opportunity

THE UNIVERSITY of Wales Trinity Saint David has officially launched a new ‘Lampeter Masterclasses’ programme and brochure.

The ‘Lampeter Masterclasses’ programme includes a range of residential weekend and evening courses for 2018. The courses on offer will appeal to a range of different audiences, covering new subject areas such as yoga, meditation and wellbeing, alongside the University’s more traditional humanities courses and disciplines which are for the first time being offered in new and different ways. UWTSD’s Lampeter campus is nestled in the heart of Lampeter and is the oldest University in Wales, and the third oldest in England and Wales after Oxford and Cambridge. It was established by Royal Charter in 1822 by Bishop Thomas Burgess of St David’s (1803-25) as St David’s College, Lampeter, with the gift of land from the local landowner, John Harford. The college took five years to build and the first students were admitted in 1827.

The new ‘Lampeter Masterclasses’ brochure provides details of the type of courses and workshops on offer, as well as the range of subject areas and topics you can study at the University’s Lampeter campus this year.

Dean for the Faculty of Humanities and Performing Arts. Dr Jeremy Smith said: “We’re very committed to lifelong learning and education for all. Regardless of age and background, whether you are retired or in fulltime employment, studying for reasons of career development or simply for the pleasure of learning, then studying the humanities in all their breadth and sweep should be available to all.

“Our structure of delivery has been adapted to offer a more personalised approach to learning. This approach to study is one that fits in with a student’s own needs and demands. So whether you want to study on certain days of the week, or study at a slower or faster pace, or simply study for its own sake and love of subject, rather than for a qualification, then we have a course appropriate to you. In other words Lampeter offers you a wide choice of courses. These range from weekly workshops, evening courses and study at a distance, occasional or ‘drop in’ lectures, weekend workshops, day courses, larger academic conferences and weekend field trips.

“We’re very proud of what we have to offer on the Lampeter campus and this brochure will show you the variation of provision we have here throughout the year. We look forward to welcoming you to the wonderful county of Ceredigion and to our beautiful Lampeter campus.”

Jacqui Weatherburn, Director of Strategic Initiatives at the University said; “The Lampeter Masterclasses’ is a new and exciting development for the University which has seen us re-imagine the Masterclass concept. This is a unique and exciting offer from our Lampeter campus which has something for every level and interest, from Expert Lectures, to Mindfulness Retreats, Interactive Workshops and a family Mediaeval day. The Programme on offer will continue to grow as the University moves to its 200th Anniversary in 2022 and as we extend the Masterclass concept across our campuses.”

To book any of the Weekend courses listed in the brochure, please visit: www.uwtsd.ac.uk/humanities-workshops

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Education

Foundation Phase Excellence Network launched

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'A new level of professional development': Kirsty Williams introduces scheme

A NEW network which aims to improve the teaching and learning of the Foundation Phase across all schools and education settings in Wales is to be launched by Education Secretary Kirsty Williams today during a visit to Llanrhidian Primary School in Swansea.

The Foundation Phase Excellence Network brings together leading figures from across the education spectrum to ensure a more structured approach to develop Foundation Phase practitioner support for those working with children age three to seven.

With the aim of inspiring young minds together, and supported by £1millon Welsh Government funding, the network will include representation from local authority education services, schools and child care settings that deliver the Foundation Phase, regional consortia, Higher Education and third sector organisations which will work together to share expertise, experience, knowledge and best practice.

A new online community learning zone has also been established to facilitate the sharing of information, resources and research between practitioners. The zone will also host 20 new case studies including three short films which showcase effective practice in Foundation Phase.

They have been produced by working collaboratively with schools and settings from across Wales in five key areas of practice: child development, environment experiences, leadership, pedagogy, and Welsh language. The case studies will be available on the new zone during March and April.

Welcoming the launch, Kirsty Williams said: “Building on similar models to our already successful National Network for Excellence in Mathematics and National Network for Excellence Science and Technology, this new Foundation Phase network will support workforce and leadership development, boost the research capacity of the education profession in Wales and ensure that implementation of the Foundation Phase happens in a consistent and effective manner.

“Practitioners in the Foundation Phase are doing an incredible job, one the toughest but most rewarding jobs around, and they deserve all our support. This network and its supporting online resources are just the start of a new level of professional development in Foundation Phase for school settings.

“This development goes to the heart of what our national mission and the new curriculum is about – raising standards, reducing the attainment gap and delivering an education system that is a source of national pride and confidence.”

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