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Issue of lifeboats raised to Prime Minister

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BEN LAKE MP made his Prime Minister’s Questions debut, raising the important issue of the future of Cardigan Bay’s lifeboat provision.

On Thursday (Apr 18) Mr Lake commended the valiant efforts of RNLI staff and volunteers at New Quay lifeboat station who have been safeguarding those who venture out into the bay, be it for work or pleasure, since 1864.

He also expressed concern at the possibility that there will no longer be an all-weather lifeboat in Ceredigion from 2020.

Mr Lake asked the Prime Minister whether she would agree ‘that the invaluable work of the RNLI serves as a fourth emergency service, and that as such it is essential the coastline of Ceredigion, like every other populated coastline, has access to this service whatever the weather?’

The Prime Minister responded: “Search and rescue at sea is provided by several organisations, including the coastguard and the RNLI. The RNLI has a proud tradition, and we should be grateful for its record on search and rescue at sea. It is obviously independent and decides where best to put its resources, but we are supporting the work of independent lifeboat charities through our Rescue Boat Grant Fund, which has allocated more than £3.5 million since 2014 to increase capacity and resilience by providing new boats and equipment.”

Ben Lake said: “I was glad of the opportunity to raise an issue that is of great concern to communities across Ceredigion with the Prime Minister. I look forward to working with the RNLI and campaign representatives in search of a long-term solution, and in particular seek to ascertain whether the Rescue Boat Grant Fund could be of benefit to ensuring the retention of an all-weather lifeboat at New Quay.”

The RNLI has decided to downgrade New Quay Lifeboat Station to an Inshore Lifeboat when the service life of its Mersey-class All-Weather Lifeboat expires in 2020.

The proposed new lifeboat will not be able to launch in conditions exceeding Force 7 in the daytime or Force 6 at night.

After 2020, there will be no All-Weather Lifeboats in the whole of Ceredigion, leaving a gap of 70 miles between the All-Weather stations of Barmouth and Fishguard.

The latest generation of All-Weather Lifeboats can travel at 25 knots in 30 minutes in calm conditions. In a challenging sea, the nearest boats at Barmouth and Fishguard would take more than an hour and a half to respond to an emergency off New Quay or Aberaeron.

The mission statement of the RNLI reads: “Our crews aim to launch their lifeboats with 10 minutes of being notified and can operate up to 100 nautical miles out at sea. We aim to reach at least 90% of all casualties within 10 nautical miles of the coast within 30 minutes of a lifeboat launch – any weather.”

The Ceredigion Lifeboat Campaign are questioning how local rescues can take place in a challenging sea to meet this aim of the RNLI. Over 10,000 have currently signed a petition campaigning against the proposed changes.

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Blue flags to fly high over Ceredigion beaches this summer

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BLUE FLAGS will fly over five of Ceredigion’s most popular beaches this summer. Borth, Aberystwyth North, New Quay Harbour, Llangrannog and Tresaith beaches have once again been awarded the coveted Blue Flag for 2018.

In addition, Ceredigion’s beaches have been awarded 4 Green Coast awards and 13 Seaside Awards.

Blue Flag and Green Coast award beaches must meet the highest water quality standard and are judged for the provision of facilities for beach user and for demonstrating good management and safety provision.

The Seaside Award recognises beaches that have good public facilities, water quality, safety provision and management.

Councillor Gareth Lloyd, Ceredigion County Council’s Cabinet Member for Economic Development and Tourism has welcomed this year’s award announcement: “Once again, Ceredigion’s beaches have been recognised to be amongst the best, not only in Wales, but worldwide. The awards are a mark of quality and it’s great to see Blue Flags and Seaside Awards flags flying at Ceredigion’s most popular bathing beaches again this year. Although Ceredigion’s coastline and beaches attract visitors throughout the year, this is an excellent start to the traditional holiday season and we look forward to a busy summer.”

The following beaches have been awarded 2018 coastal awards:

Blue Flag
Borth, Aberystwyth North, New Quay Harbour, Llangrannog, Tresaith

Seaside Award
Borth, Clarach, Aberystwyth North,  Aberystwyth South, Llanrhystud, New Quay Harbour, New Quay Dolau, Llangrannog, Cilborth – Llangrannog, Tresaith, Aberporth, Mwnt, Penbryn

Green Coast
Llanrhystud, Mwnt, Penbryn, Cilborth – Llangrannog

Wales’s coastal awards are administered by Keep Wales Tidy.

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Police officers to have spit and bite guards from today

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FROM today (May 18) front-line police officers across Carmarthenshire, Ceredigion, Pembrokeshire and Powys will be equipped with spit and bite guards.

Spit and bite guards, made from a loose-fitting, lightweight mesh fabric, are placed over a person’s head to help minimise the risks of diseases and injuries associated with spitting and biting.

This means if someone spits or bites, or threatens to spit or bite, officers have a new piece of equipment to protect themselves and others.

Assistant Chief Constable Richard Lewis said: “Both spitting and biting are a particularly unpleasant form of assault and should not be considered by anyone to be an acceptable part of the job. Figures show there were 77 spit and bite incidents against Dyfed-Powys Police officers and staff in 2017 alone – more than six per month, on average.

“Assaults by spitting and biting can have long-term and distressing implications for officers, who sometimes have to take medication for many weeks afterwards to prevent infection.

“Use of force tactics, such as spit and bite guards, are there to protect not only the public but also for the safety of our officers, who face dangerous situations every day.

“It is imperative that we employ proportionate and appropriate tactics in each situation we face in order to achieve our number one objective, protecting the public.

“Our officers go through rigorous and continued training on tactics which are considered by the Home Office as a use of force. Officers are highly trained to use force proportionately, lawfully and only when necessary.

“The Chief Officer team has listened to concerns raised by officers as well as taking on board recent recommendations from the National Police Chief’s Council and have taken the decision that spit guards will be rolled out to all front line officers across the force, in line with 25 other police forces nationally.”

Dyfed-Powys Police and Crime Commissioner, Dafydd Llywelyn, said: “Dyfed-Powys Police officers do their utmost to deliver invaluable services to the public, day in day out, no matter the circumstances. It is not right that they are subject to abuse whilst performing their duties, and it is our duty to protect those who strive to keep us safe and free from harm.

“In March 2018 I wrote to Members of Parliament to encourage them to support the passage on Emergency Workers (Offences) Bill through the House of Commons. It is an important initiative which seeks to underline the importance of protecting emergency workers from assaults such as spitting and biting, and is a significant step in highlighting our mutual stance on this matter. It is of utmost importance that we take action to protect our police officers.”

College of Policing said: “Spit guards are for the protection of the arresting officer, other emergency service personnel and the public.

“It is recognised that the need to use spit guards or handcuffs during the restraint of an individual may cause distress to them and those who witness the arrest.

“However, as well as serving as protective equipment for the officer, it is also recognised that, by eliminating the risk of being spat on, bitten or the transmission of communicable diseases, the need for physical restraint may be reduced.

“As such, the risk of serious physical injury to the individual being arrested, is also reduced.

“The College has recently led a national review of the Personal Safety Training given to officers, which includes a section on spit guards and the medical implications of their use.

“As with all use of force, it will be for the arresting officer to justify their actions in each individual circumstance. The availability and use of equipment such as spit guards remain a local decision for each chief constable.”

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Motorcyclist airlifted to hospital following crash

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A MOTORCYCLIST who was involved in a single-vehicle incident on the A482 was airlifted to hospital.

The incident, which happened at approximately 6pn yesterday (May 17), took place between Pumsaint and Lampeter.

The rider of the Triumph motorcycle was airlifted to Morriston Hospital in Swansea by the Wales Air Ambulance.

The helicopter landed in a nearby field.

A Welsh Ambulance Service spokesperson said: “We were called at shortly after 5.50pm on Thursday to reports of a road traffic collision involving a motorbike on the A482 near Lampeter.

“We sent a Wales Air Ambulance and a crew in an emergency ambulance and a man was airlifted to Morriston Hospital in Swansea in a stable condition.”

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