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Farming

395 farms join animal health project

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AS 2020 begins, it’s been announced that 395 beef and sheep farmers from across Wales have so far signed up to a pro-active animal health planning project, Stoc+, promoted by Hybu Cig Cymru – Meat Promotion Wales (HCC) in a bid to improve overall health of their flock and ultimately, enhancing animal health planning and boosting production efficiency.
Stoc+ forms one part of HCC’s three-strand, Welsh Government and European Union funded Red Meat Development Programme (RMDP).
During the course of the five-year project HCC will bring together up to 500 commercial sheep and beef producers across Wales and encourage them to adopt a ‘prevention is better than cure’ approach to animal health.
Each participating farmer will receive practical, expert advice and specialist support for up to three years. In addition, all farmers will benefit from a tailor-made Flock and Herd Health Plan and Action Plan to work towards various targets set by their local veterinary practitioner.
As part of the project, the team have identified a small number of ambassadors who include farmers and veterinary practitioners. The ambassadors’ role includes encouraging their peers to get involved and demonstrating the practical benefits of proactive health planning in terms of animal health and farm profitability.
Jonathan Lewis from Llandrindod Wells is one of the ambassadors. Mr Lewis’s upland farm has 80 Simmental, Limousin and Stabiliser cows and 1,680 Lleyn, Mules and Welsh Mountain sheep and lambs. He said, “There were many reasons behind joining the project. I wanted to improve the overall health of my flock as well as increase the number of lambs that I sold whilst reducing the number of days to slaughter. During the course of the project, I would also like to reduce the antibiotics used on the farm and be advised on how to improve biosecurity.”
Claire Jones of Dolgellau Vets is a vet ambassador for the project, and as a vet and farmer’s wife, has a passion for preventative medicine and herd and flock health work. Claire says, “Health planning is something that I feel should be an integral part of all farm management, as it improves the efficiency of the farm and health of the animals and also helps to improve the vet and farmer communication and relationship.”
For more information on the project and to meet other project ambassadors visit the HCC website.
Stoc+ is supported by the Welsh Government Rural Communities – Rural Development Programme 2014 – 2020, which is funded by the European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development and the Welsh Government.

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Farming

McDonald’s backs Countryside Fund

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McDonald'S: Fast-food giant backing Prince Charles' charity

McDonald’S: Fast-food giant backing Prince Charles’ charity

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McDONALD’s UK has entered into a three-year partnership with The Prince’s Countryside Fund, supporting the charity’s work in improving the economic resilience of farming families.
The Prince’s Countryside Fund, set up by HRH The Prince of Wales in 2010, works with farming and rural communities throughout the UK, and to date has provided over £10 million in grant and initiative funding.
Since 2016, the Fund’s flagship scheme, The Prince’s Farm Resilience Programme, has supported over 900 farming families to improve their business skills with free training and professional advice, in 60 locations across the British Isles. The programme has a track record of success, with evidence of significant behavioural change occurring – 91% of participating families improve their communication, and 89% have a better understanding of costs as a result of taking part.
McDonald’s works with over 23,000 British and Irish farmers, the partnership with the Prince’s Countryside Fund cements the business’ commitment to their futures, as well as the future of the farming industry.
Thanks to the support of McDonald’s, the Fund is launching the ‘Beef it Up’ scheme in 2020, a series of group workshops aimed at livestock farms in the Farm Resilience Programme alumni network. In order to further strengthen these farm businesses, the workshops will address topics including:
Animal health and welfare
Farm safety
Economic resilience
Environmental management
The ‘Beef it Up’ workshops will help farms to continuously improve their practices and sustainability performance, by introducing them to practical steps they can take to immediately make changes to their production systems.
McDonald’s already has a proven track record in sharing knowledge through Farm Forward – an agriculture programme with three aims; to develop skills and knowledge in the industry, raise animal welfare standards and encourage environmental improvements to help create a sustainable future for British and Irish farming.
The partnership marks the latest step in McDonald’s sustainability journey and together with The Prince’s Countryside Fund and the business’ suppliers, the partnership will create fresh new solutions to the big challenges the industry is facing, promoting innovation that aims to futureproof the sector.
Claire Saunders, Director of The Prince’s Countryside Fund said: “I am thrilled that the Fund will be working again with McDonald’s, in order to help us improve the prospects of family farm businesses across the UK at such a critical time.”
Nina Prichard, Head of Sustainable and Ethical Sourcing at McDonald’s UK & Ireland said: “Our supply chain is absolutely critical to our success – we couldn’t serve the food that we’re famous for without the support and hard work of 23,000 British and Irish farmers. This partnership is an important move in supporting them and securing their future – farming is part of the fabric of our society, and we are delighted to be working with The Prince’s Countryside Fund on this resilience programme.”

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Farming

Ocean currents affect crop yields

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Sea change: Could produce colder, drier weather

CROP production in Britain will fall dramatically if climate change causes the collapse of a vital pattern of ocean currents, new research suggests.
The Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) brings heat from the tropics, making Britain warmer and wetter than it would otherwise be.
University of Exeter scientists show that, while warming Britain is expected to boost food production, if the AMOC collapses it would not just wipe out these gains but cause the “widespread cessation of arable (crop-growing) farming” across Britain.
Such a collapse – a climate change “tipping point” – would leave Britain cooler, drier and unsuitable for many crops, the study says.
The main problem would be reduced rainfall and, though irrigation could be used, the amount of water and the costs “appear to be prohibitive”.
“If the AMOC collapsed, we would expect to see much more dramatic change than is currently expected due to climate change,” said Dr Paul Ritchie, of the University of Exeter.
“Such a collapse would reverse the effects of warming in Britain, creating an average temperature drop of 3.4°C and leading to a substantial reduction in rainfall (−123mm during the growing season).
“These changes, especially the drying, could make most land unsuitable for arable farming.”
The study examines a “fast and early” collapse of the AMOC, which is considered “low-probability” at present – though the AMOC has weakened by an estimated 15% over the last 50 years.
Professor Tim Lenton, Director of the Global Systems Institute at the University of Exeter, said worst-case scenarios must be considered when calculating risks.
“Any risk assessment needs to get a handle on the large impacts if such a tipping point is reached, even if it is a low-probability event” he said.
“The point of this detailed study was to discover how stark the impacts of AMOC collapse could be.”
The study follows a recent paper by Lenton and colleagues warning of a possible “cascade” of inter-related tipping points.
The new study reinforces the message that “we would be wise to act now to minimise the risk of passing climate tipping points” said Lenton.
Growing crops is generally more profitable than using land as pasture for livestock rearing, but much of northern and western Britain is unsuitable for arable farming.
“With the land area suitable for arable farming expected to drop from 32% to 7% under AMOC collapse, we could see a major reduction in the value of agricultural output,” said Professor Ian Bateman, of Exeter’s Land, Environment, Economics and Policy Institute.
“In this scenario, we estimate a decrease of £346 million per year – a reduction of over 10% in the net value of British farming.”
Speaking about the expectation that moderate warming would boost agricultural production in Britain, he added: “It’s important to note that the wider effects for the UK and beyond will be very negative as import costs rise steeply and the costs of most goods climb.”
The study focusses on agriculture, but AMOC collapse and the resulting temperature drop could lead to a host of other economic costs for the UK.
The AMOC is one reason that average temperatures in Britain are warmer than those of many places at similar latitudes. For example, Moscow and the southern extremes of Alaska are further south than Edinburgh.

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Farming

Caution over CAP replacement funding

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THE LIBERAL DEMOCRATS in Wales have criticised the UK Conservative Government following its announcement showing Welsh farmers will receive less financial support than they currently get from the EU.
At present farming subsidies from the EU, mostly distributed under the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP), amount to around £350million a year for Welsh farmers. This represents more than 80% of average farm incomes in Wales.
The Government’s new announcement outlined a £2.85billion funding package to replace EU funding, in which £231million is allocated to Wales.
Jane Dodds, Leader of the Welsh Liberal Democrats said: “Brexit is already threatening the livelihoods of our farmers, especially given the threat of no deal at the end of 2020. They need certainty and security, not less support and additional barriers to trade.
“This is a far cry from the grand promises that were made to Welsh farmers and is just another case of Conservatives saying one thing at an election and then doing another afterwards.
“The Welsh Liberal Democrats demand better for our farmers. The Conservatives must honour their commitment to guarantee existing funding in full and stop playing political games with our farmers’ futures.”
The Welsh Government’s response was not as condemnatory as Ms Dodds, but also noted the limited nature of the funding guarantee.
The Welsh Government also confirmed that it will be holding back the maximum amount of funding permitted to fund its pet projects in 2021/22 and keeping it out of farmers’ hands.
Among those projects are a commitment to reduce farming by planting woodland on agricultural land and a range of the environmental schemes favoured by those who find agriculture an impediment to their enjoyment of the countryside after they move to Wales.
Lesley Griffiths said: “Wales has benefitted from many years of European investment, including in agriculture and rural development. This is of vital importance to Welsh farmers and rural communities.
“We welcome the announcement from the Treasury; but let us be clear, this is only making good on commitments already made.
“I would call on the UK Government to provide guarantees of funding for agriculture and to replace other current EU funds for future years. This will allow us to plan important future work to support agriculture, develop the economy, tackle climate change and protect our environment.”
NFU Cymru President, Mr John Davies said: “I am pleased to have confirmation from the UK Government that current levels of support will be maintained for 2020. This helps provide some stability and continuity as we prepare to leave the European Union and establish new trading relationships with the EU27 and much of the rest of the world. Farming is, of course, a long term business with lengthy and complex production cycles, and farmers need as much certainty as possible around levels of future support payments to be able to plan for the future.”
Mr Davies continued: “This announcement is very welcome, but to help secure the future of Welsh agriculture I would very much like to see the government act to ensure that Wales’ farmers are not unfairly undermined by imports produced to environmental and animal welfare standards which would be illegal here. I very much want 2020 to be the year in which the UK Government signals its commitment to upholding high standards of production, by setting up a council on trade and standards which can advise Ministers on future trade policy, and help ensure our high standards are upheld, not undermined in any future trade deals.”
Andrew RT Davies, the Conservatives’ Senedd spokesperson on agriculture who claimed Welsh farmers would not lose a single of penny of funding throughout 2016’s referendum campaign, said: “This commitment is a down payment on the Welsh Conservatives’ Westminster manifesto pledge to guarantee funding for the farming community during the lifetime of this UK Parliament (2024).”
Mr Davies continued: “It’s now high time that the tired Welsh Labour Government in Cardiff Bay raised its game and started to deliver for the rural economy of Wales, something they have spectacularly failed to do for 20 years of devolution.”
Plaid Cymru has accused the Tory Westminster Government of “a cynical rehash” in response to the UK Chancellor once again announcing that the same level of funding for the Basic Payment Scheme will continue for 2020.
But while the allocation for farming subsidy is similar to that of 2019, the UK Government has not committed to providing the extra 15% of funding which the Welsh Government has been transferring to its Rural Development fund.
Responding to the announcement, Plaid Cymru’s Westminster Group Leader, Liz Saville Roberts MP said: “This announcement is a cynical rehash of funding promised to Wales last year by the Tories.
“It does not make up for the years of uncertainty Welsh farmers have had to face due to Brexit, and it does not take the disastrous prospect of ‘no deal’ off the table.
“These payments are a lifeline for Wales’s agricultural sector and they must be protected by all means if the industry is to survive.
Llyr Gruffydd AM, Plaid Cymru’s Rural Affairs spokesperson in the Senedd added: “The Chancellor needs to urgently clarify that the £45million shortfall will be made up in full.”

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