Connect with us
Advertisement
Advertisement

News

Couple’s mortgage fraud trial delayed

Published

on

Swansea crown court (1)THE TRIAL of a business couple accused of a string of frauds across west Wales could be delayed for almost a year, a judge heard today.
 
John James Carney, aged 56, and Tracey Angela Heyman, 49, are to stand trial before a jury at Swansea crown court but an earlier hearing had been told that Carney had fallen ill.
 
The same court was told today that he had since undergone a serious operation on his bowel and that it was unclear how much, if any, further treatment would be necessary.
 
The original trial date in September was abandoned, as expected, and now the couple will not go on trial before March, 2015, because of a combination of Carney’s state of health and pressure on court time.
 
Carney and Heyman, now living at 2 Kelsey Head, Port Solent, Portsmouth, Hampshire, have denied six charges of fraud involving allegations that the couple obtained mortgages by pretending that Heyman was paid an annual salary by Discipline by Design ranging from £37,000 to £75,000.
 
The properties were 33 Bryn Steffan, Lampeter (£104,000 mortgage), 35 Bryn Steffan (£109,000), 59 Addison Drive, Lincoln (£77,775), Madryn, Llanybydder (£205,000) Arosta, Llanybydder (£124,000) and 39 Bryn Steffan (£159,110).
 
They also deny obtaining a £698,000 mortgage by fraud to obtain Plas Llangoedmor Mansion, Cardigan, and a £560,000 mortgage to obtain The Thatched Farmhouse, Llanybydder, by falsely representing that they each received an annual salary of £250,000.
 
They have also pleaded not guilty to obtaining a £357,000 flexible business loan from Natwest by falsely predicting business income of between £433,000 and £533,000 a year.
 
The couple also deny making false representations in order to obtain the approval of creditors for a voluntary agreement by failing to disclose that they owned 35 Bryn Steffan and Audi cars.
 
Carney and Heyman also deny fraud by obtaining car insurance for Carney by falsely claiming that he had a valid UK driver’s licence and that he did not have any motoring convictions.
 
Carney alone denies attempting to pervert the course of justice by carrying out a series of acts that included giving instructions for documents to be removed and arranging for monies to be paid into the account of another person.
 
All the offending was said to have taken place between August 17, 2004, and November 30, 2012.
 
The couple are on bail.
Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

News

£400 fine for shooting neighbour’s cat following RSPCA prosecution

Published

on

A MAN has been fined after shooting a neighbour’s cat in Ceredigion, leading to the animal’s tragic death.

John Quinney, 71, admitted causing unnecessary suffering to the cat, named Fluff, after the animal was shot by a pellet gun in an incident which took place on, or about, 27 March 2017.

The incident is one of 41 pellet gun incidents across Wales reported to the RSPCA during the first half of 2017 – compared to 58 throughout the entirety of the previous year. An RSPCA inspector has labelled it a “depressing example” of the “fatal nature” of pellet guns.

Mr Quinney, of Newcastle Emlyn, was sentenced at Aberystwyth Justice Centre on Wednesday (13 December). He was told to pay £400 in costs, a £160 fine and a £30 victim surcharge.

He claimed his intention was not to shoot the cat, and that the animal was taken to a vet after the incident occurred.

RSPCA inspector Keith Hogben said: “This poor cat lost his life because of this man’s negligence with a pellet gun.

“Sadly, this shocking incident is a depressing example as to the potentially fatal nature of these guns, if used in this way. Cats – like Fluff – are so often the victim.

“It is absolutely tragic to see an innocent, defenceless creature like this lose his life as a consequence of such a needless occurrence.

“Clearly, stricter regulations around owning an airgun, and better education and safety training for owners, would be a step in the right direction to keeping animals safe from shootings like this.”

Continue Reading

News

A digital future for Ceredigion

Published

on

STARTING from today (Dec 15), we are excited to announce that The Ceredigion Herald will be a digital only publication.

Our website and social media pages have always been an important outlet for delivering news to Ceredigion, and with the re-launch of Herald Radio this year, and the launch of our news channel Herald News 24 next year, the methods in which we deliver news to Ceredigion is only going from strength to strength.

Put simply, what this means for our readers is more content, delivered quicker, and with all the benefits that only an online platform can provide – such as picture galleries and video content.

Since the first edition, The Ceredigion Herald has gained a reputation for tackling the tough stories which others ignored, reporting on local news and events, and being a voice for the communities across Ceredigion.

This is not changing.

Over the coming weeks and months we will be rolling out new additions to the website, launching our online news channel, and much more.

We hope you look forward to the evolution as much as we are, and if you have any comments, feedback or ideas, we’d love to hear them.

A note from the Editor

There’s a headline that means exactly what it says on the tin.

This is the last print edition of The Ceredigion Herald.

And there’s another bald statement to follow the first.

We have been reviewing how we offer news to our readers for several months and have decided to use Ceredigion as a test bed for a new and exciting way of delivering news to Ceredigion.

It is a new way of doing things.

The smart language says it is ‘hyperlocal media’ – it’s the buzz phrase alighted upon by media know-alls who think local news is solely commercial and not a service. What ‘hyperlocal’ means is local news, locally focused, provided locally; or at least it should … as we will see below.

The Herald family of newspapers have always pushed the news agenda in each of our publication areas and we want to find out if we can also expand the way in which local news is presented online. In order to do that, we made the difficult decision to end print publication in Ceredigion and to test the market for digital news in a way which is more than the usual one man band ranting away on Facebook or on a website.

We have been paying close attention to the workings of the Welsh Assembly Committee on Culture, Welsh Language, and Media and also been following the way in which the Welsh Assembly itself is considering reshaping the way it communicates with the public under the guidance of advisers such as former Cabinet member Leighton Andrews.

Local print media in Wales is dominated by newspaper groups – Newsquest and Trinity Mirror – who, particularly in the case of the latter, have abandoned their local news offer in favour of directing people looking for local news to clickbait sourced and provided in Cardiff. Their reward for that indolence and neglect is having public money thrown at them via the licence fee to persuade them to cover news they sacrificed in order to tell the public the top ten cat names in New Tredegar.

The Cambrian News, a Tindle publication, is one of the few local newspapers in Wales that both reports on local news and subjects the local authority to some scrutiny. Apart from The Herald group and a few other independent local news outlets, you will need to search long and hard for other newspapers who do what local newspapers should do and always used to do: hold power to account, report on the local courts, and reflect the communities they serve with humour and rigour.

At The Herald, our focus has been on three strands of news: local, regional, Welsh national. We have done that because we believe that the way local councils and regional bodies exercise their power over us all is inextricably linked to what the Welsh Government does and – beyond that – how UK policies affect Wales, west Wales, and our edition areas. Treating our readers as though they want more than hatches, matches, dispatches combined with a little jam and Jerusalem is the Herald way of doing things.

We do not always get things right – sometimes we get things wrong – but we believe that there is more to news than just the superficial. We believe that good newspapers are properly sceptical reporters and commentators on events that impact their local communities. It is also right to be sceptical and subject news stories to as much rigorous analysis as can be fitted into seven days of writing.

That is not going to change.

Like all media outlets, you will get a share of press releases – that happens everywhere. However, with those press releases you will still get original news reporting, shaped for an online audience, and supported and complemented by other unique local media provided by Herald outlets.

Herald Radio has been broadcasting for some time online. Unlike other ‘local’ radio, this is properly local. Local presenters talking about local events. It appeals to a fresh and young audience. The Herald Group is now going to also provide local video news reporting online. From our studios, we will cover local news – Ceredigion news, west Wales news, Welsh national news – and provide those reports online via our online outlets. Those will all feed into The Ceredigion Herald’s future online offer to our readers. It is a new way of approaching local news by a local newspaper group: a fresh way, and a new challenge.

And we will do so in Welsh and in English.

We say it’s a challenge, and it is also a test. We will be finding out what works, what doesn’t work, and what opportunities there are for improvement as we develop and shape our service to you.

We are proud of what we have managed to bring to Ceredigion in the time we have printed and published The Ceredigion Herald. Local news needs to be plural to stop one voice and one viewpoint drowning out all others.

We are going to continue to provide a different voice and different viewpoint. We will just be doing it in a different way.

For The Ceredigion Herald, it’s not the end.

It’s the future.

Continue Reading

News

FUW holds open meeting to discuss bank closures

Published

on

​IN LIGHT of the announced NatWest bank closures in Ceredigion, affecting the Lampeter and Cardigan branches, the Farmers’ Union of Wales is holding open meetings with Plaid Cymru to discuss a way forward with local MP Ben Lake and AM Elin Jones.

The meetings will take place on Thursday ​(​Dec 21​)​ at Lampeter Rugby Club and Thursday, January 18 at the Guildhall, Cardigan. Both meetings will commence at 7.30pm and are open to all.

Speaking ahead of the meetings, ​​FUW Ceredigion CEO Mared Jones said: “The closure of those banks will have a detrimental effect​ on​ our local towns, as they serve not only villages close by but many of the neighbourhoods in surrounding areas, as well as providing employment to local people.

“We are therefore holding two open meetings with our local elected representatives to discuss a way forward and I hope many of you will be able to join us.”

Continue Reading

Popular This Week