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Police commissioner: ‘Prioritise spending on bobbies not bricks’

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comissionerTHE POLICE landscape of Dyfed-Powys is to change, with leading figures planning a force more in tune with modern public needs. The change comes in the form of a long-term estates strategy agreed by Police and Crime Commissioner Christopher Salmon and Chief Constable Simon Prince. It follows a review of all properties used by the police around Carmarthenshire, Ceredigion, Pembrokeshire and Powys. The strategy aims to balance the need for community policing and other force operations with the cost of using and maintaining buildings with public money. Mr Salmon, who owns the police estate as part of his work, said: “I want to prioritise our spending on bobbies not bricks. “The estates strategy will help ensure police officers can be seen and contacted in line with the public’s modern needs and wishes. “It will ensure that our communities receive an effective, efficient and professional service. “With some of our many buildings being expensive to run or under-used, the strategy will mean a wise use of public money. “Front line services will be prioritised with innovation in the use of buildings and technology. We’re looking at solutions such as sharing spaces with partner agencies and organisations. “Much of our existing property will be retained but the services operated from some will relocate to nearby premises in the same community. “For some locations we seek alternative arrangements after which the existing premises will close. New, well-considered arrangements will be put in place and publicised before any relocation or closure occurs. “The whole process will take up to three years; individual plans will be made for each area and will be carefully thought through with the needs of the community and the region taken into account. “I understand that some people may be concerned at the prospect of change but I assure them that they can start looking forward to improved services. “In the meantime, we’ve created 30 new police officer posts in response to what the public have consistently told me in the 18 months since my election – they want to see officers on the streets. After all, it’s bobbies that catch criminals – not bricks.” Mr Prince said: “My priority is to ensure that the appropriate number of police officers and PCSOs are working within our communities. “To achieve this, we’re thinking differently – with efficiency in mind – as to how we best use our police buildings. “Our new approach is very much about ‘business as usual’, with officers sharing space with partner agencies, using mobile police stations and promoting local visibility and engagement opportunities.” The force uses around 70 sites with total annual running costs of around £2.9m and a 10-year maintenance requirement of around £10.3m. Force priorities have evolved in recent years, with a greater emphasis now on community policing. Central funding is down from around £60.5m in 2011-12 to £53m in 2014-15. Recent Dyfed-Powys Police initiatives have included a pledge that “When we’re in, we’re open” – police station visitors are seen as long as an officer is on site and it is safe to do so. To tell Mr Salmon what you would like to see from your local policing services in future, contact his office: Mail – OPCC, PO Box 99, Llangunnor, Carmarthen, SA31 2PF; email – opcc@dyfed-powys. pnn.police.uk. Talk on Twitter using #MyPolicePlaces.

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Police trying to track stolen tanker

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DYFED-POWYS POLICE is investigating the theft of a fuel tanker containing approximately 8,500 litres of diesel (4,000 litres of red diesel and 4,500 litres of white diesel).

The vehicle was taken from Tan Y Foel Quarry, Cefn Coch, Welshpool, between 5.30pm on Wednesday, May 23 and 6am on Thursday, May 24.

The police are asking people to see if the tanker is now in this area.

Anyone with information that can help officers with their investigation is asked to report it by calling 101. If you are deaf, hard of hearing or speech impaired text the non-emergency number on 07811 311 908, quoting Ref: DPP/0006/24/05/2018/01/C.

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Reprogrammed virus offers hope as cancer treatment

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A CANCER treatment that can completely destroy cancer cells without affecting healthy cells could soon be a possibility, thanks to research led by Cardiff University.

The team of researchers has successfully ‘trained’ a respiratory virus to recognise ovarian cancer and completely destroy it without infecting other cells. The reprogrammed virus could also be used to treat other cancers such as breast, pancreatic, lung and oral.

Dr Alan Parker from Cardiff University’s School of Medicine said: “Reprogrammed viruses are already being used in gene therapy procedures to treat a range of diseases, demonstrating they can be trained from being life-threatening into potentially lifesaving agents.

“In cancer treatment, up until now, reprogrammed viruses have not been able to selectively recognise only the cancer cells and would also infect healthy cells, resulting in unwanted side effects.

“We’ve taken a common, well-studied virus and completely redesigned it so that it can no longer attach to non-cancerous cells but instead seeks out a specific marker protein called αvβ6 integrin, which is unique to certain cancer cells, allowing it to invade them.

“In this case we introduced the reprogrammed virus to ovarian cancer which it successfully identified and destroyed.

“This is an exciting advance, offering real potential for patients with a variety of cancers.”

Once the virus enters the cancer cell it uses the cell’s machinery to replicate, producing many thousands of copies of itself, prior to bursting the cell and thereby destroying it in the process. The newly released viral copies can then bind and infect neighbouring cancer cells and repeat the same cycle, eventually removing the tumour mass altogether.

The virus also activates the body’s natural immune system, helping it to recognise and destroy the malignant cells.

The reprogrammed virus is from a group of respiratory viruses called adenoviruses. The advantage of using these viruses is that they are relatively easy to manipulate and have already been safely used in cancer treatment.

The technique used to reprogramme the virus to identify the protein common to ovarian, breast, pancreatic, lung and oral cancers could also be used to manipulate it so that it would recognise proteins common to other groups of cancers.

Additional refinement to the viral DNA could also allow the virus to produce anticancer drugs, such as antibodies, during the process of infecting cancer cells. This effectively turns the cancer into a factory producing drugs that will cause its own destruction.

The research was carried out in a laboratory, using mice with ovarian cancer, and has not yet reached clinical trials. The next step is to test the technique with other cancers, with a view to starting clinical trials in five years’ time.

Dr Catherine Pickworth from Cancer Research UK said: “It’s encouraging to see that this virus, which has been modified to recognise markers on cancer cells, has the ability to infect and kill ovarian cancer cells in the lab. Viruses are nature’s nanotechnology and harnessing their ability to hijack cells is an area of growing interest in cancer research.

“The next step will be more research to see if this could be a safe and effective strategy to use in people.”

The team includes researchers from Cardiff University; the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, USA; Glasgow University; the South West Wales Cancer Institute; and Velindre Cancer Centre.

The research was funded by Cancer Research UK, Tenovus Cancer Care and Cancer Research Wales.

The paper ‘Ad5NULL-A20 – a tropism-modified, αvβ6 integrin-selective oncolytic adenovirus for epithelial ovarian cancer therapies’ is published in Clinical Cancer Research.

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Money raised by Canolfan Padarn in the Race for Life

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STAFF and service users from Canolfan Padarn took part in this year’s Race for Life which took place on Sunday, May 13.

Service users Debbie, Lowri and Donna had been training for months as part of the centre’s healthy lifestyle group and were joined by staff members Lina, Ellie-May, Heather, Jenny, Dawn and Anwen, along with Heather’s daughter Cala, and Anwen’s daughter Jena.

Canolfan Padarn Support Worker Ellie-May Watkins said: “The crowd gave the crew great support and we’re grateful to everyone who cheered us on. We’d like to say a huge thank you to Queens Road Bowling Club for use of their facilities on the day. Previously, Canolfan Padarn raised £330 for Cancer research, we hope that we will match or exceed that in sponsorship this year.”

Canolfan Padarn is a community resource base for adults with learning disabilities in Aberystwyth, offering social, leisure and work opportunities in the local area.

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