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A “spiteful” burglar who targeted the home of a bride knowing she would be at her wedding has been jailed.

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86576Ceri Davies, 26, broke into Annwen Bell’s home as she was marrying her long term partner Jonathan.
Davies “trashed” the house after learning that his mother, Jill, had not been invited to the wedding.
Annwen Bell’s father had left home two years earlier and formed a relationship with Davies’ mother.
As Annwen and Jonathan planned their wedding it was decided not to invite Jill Davies “to keep the peace”.
They invited her father but Annwen refused to allow him to give her away.
Janet Gedrych, prosecuting, told Swansea crown court how Davies broke into the couple’s home at Maes Gwyn, Llanfair Clydogau, west Wales, on the afternoon of May 25 knowing that the couple were due to be married at 3pm and to then enjoy a reception in the seaside village of Aberaeron 20 miles away.
“It was motivated by malice,” she added. “It was targeted to that house due to the relationships between the parties
“Annwen had taken her mother’s side and there was ill feeling between the two sides.”
Davies caused Ł5,500 worth of damage, slashing furniture with a knife, leaving on water taps in a bathroom and the kitchen to cause flooding and using a hammer to leave imprints on computers, televisions and kitchen work surfaces.
He also stole Ł295 in cash, a 20 euro note and even the cards of congratulations for the marriage.
But, said Miss Gedrych, two men carrying out an archaeology study nearby heard the sound of breaking glass and challenged Davies.
They saw him leaving the property with a carrier bag and followed him.
They called the police who continued the chase until Davies threw away the bag and ran across a field.
But he was caught by police and arrested.
Miss Gedrych said police had to approach the couple at their reception that evening and explain that their home had been burgled and trashed.
In a victim impact statement, Jonathan Bell said, “Annwen invited her father to the wedding but she was not willing for him to give her away.
“It was such a special day and we cannot remember that day as we should.
“Gifts from her grandparents were broken. It does not feel like a home anymore.”
Jill Davies was also arrested after police became aware that her car had been in the area at the time. But she said she had given her son a lift so he could go for a walk and had no idea a burglary would be carried out. She was not charged with any offence.
Davies, of Room 2, 4 Albert Place, Aberystwyth, admitted burglary and causing criminal damage. He was jailed for three years and four months.
Davies’ barrister, Victoria Thomas, said Davies was addicted to cannabis at the time.
“That does not take away the pain that was caused to the couple. It was their wedding day.
“His mother accepts that what he did was terrible. She is ashamed at what he has done.
“He ruined their wedding day,” added Miss Thomas.
She said he turned on water taps in the hope of washing away any DNA evidence.
Judge Paul Thomas told Davies, “Any house burglary is taken very seriously by the courts. It usually causes psychological and emotional harm.
“In any way this was a particularly spiteful burglary. It was a revenge attack.”
Davies, he added, had set out to cause as much harm as he could to a woman on the most important day of her life.
“It was a simple dispute. Because of the wedding your mother had not been invited. It happens at weddings week in, week out.
“But you decided not only to burgle their home but to wreck it. You vindictively trashed their home.
“You made as sure as you could that they would come back and they would face a scene of heartbreaking devastation.”
Judge Thomas said Davies had a record for arson and criminal damage and “seemed to get a kick” out of destroying other people’s property and the pain it caused them.

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Police trying to track stolen tanker

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DYFED-POWYS POLICE is investigating the theft of a fuel tanker containing approximately 8,500 litres of diesel (4,000 litres of red diesel and 4,500 litres of white diesel).

The vehicle was taken from Tan Y Foel Quarry, Cefn Coch, Welshpool, between 5.30pm on Wednesday, May 23 and 6am on Thursday, May 24.

The police are asking people to see if the tanker is now in this area.

Anyone with information that can help officers with their investigation is asked to report it by calling 101. If you are deaf, hard of hearing or speech impaired text the non-emergency number on 07811 311 908, quoting Ref: DPP/0006/24/05/2018/01/C.

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Reprogrammed virus offers hope as cancer treatment

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A CANCER treatment that can completely destroy cancer cells without affecting healthy cells could soon be a possibility, thanks to research led by Cardiff University.

The team of researchers has successfully ‘trained’ a respiratory virus to recognise ovarian cancer and completely destroy it without infecting other cells. The reprogrammed virus could also be used to treat other cancers such as breast, pancreatic, lung and oral.

Dr Alan Parker from Cardiff University’s School of Medicine said: “Reprogrammed viruses are already being used in gene therapy procedures to treat a range of diseases, demonstrating they can be trained from being life-threatening into potentially lifesaving agents.

“In cancer treatment, up until now, reprogrammed viruses have not been able to selectively recognise only the cancer cells and would also infect healthy cells, resulting in unwanted side effects.

“We’ve taken a common, well-studied virus and completely redesigned it so that it can no longer attach to non-cancerous cells but instead seeks out a specific marker protein called αvβ6 integrin, which is unique to certain cancer cells, allowing it to invade them.

“In this case we introduced the reprogrammed virus to ovarian cancer which it successfully identified and destroyed.

“This is an exciting advance, offering real potential for patients with a variety of cancers.”

Once the virus enters the cancer cell it uses the cell’s machinery to replicate, producing many thousands of copies of itself, prior to bursting the cell and thereby destroying it in the process. The newly released viral copies can then bind and infect neighbouring cancer cells and repeat the same cycle, eventually removing the tumour mass altogether.

The virus also activates the body’s natural immune system, helping it to recognise and destroy the malignant cells.

The reprogrammed virus is from a group of respiratory viruses called adenoviruses. The advantage of using these viruses is that they are relatively easy to manipulate and have already been safely used in cancer treatment.

The technique used to reprogramme the virus to identify the protein common to ovarian, breast, pancreatic, lung and oral cancers could also be used to manipulate it so that it would recognise proteins common to other groups of cancers.

Additional refinement to the viral DNA could also allow the virus to produce anticancer drugs, such as antibodies, during the process of infecting cancer cells. This effectively turns the cancer into a factory producing drugs that will cause its own destruction.

The research was carried out in a laboratory, using mice with ovarian cancer, and has not yet reached clinical trials. The next step is to test the technique with other cancers, with a view to starting clinical trials in five years’ time.

Dr Catherine Pickworth from Cancer Research UK said: “It’s encouraging to see that this virus, which has been modified to recognise markers on cancer cells, has the ability to infect and kill ovarian cancer cells in the lab. Viruses are nature’s nanotechnology and harnessing their ability to hijack cells is an area of growing interest in cancer research.

“The next step will be more research to see if this could be a safe and effective strategy to use in people.”

The team includes researchers from Cardiff University; the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, USA; Glasgow University; the South West Wales Cancer Institute; and Velindre Cancer Centre.

The research was funded by Cancer Research UK, Tenovus Cancer Care and Cancer Research Wales.

The paper ‘Ad5NULL-A20 – a tropism-modified, αvβ6 integrin-selective oncolytic adenovirus for epithelial ovarian cancer therapies’ is published in Clinical Cancer Research.

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Money raised by Canolfan Padarn in the Race for Life

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STAFF and service users from Canolfan Padarn took part in this year’s Race for Life which took place on Sunday, May 13.

Service users Debbie, Lowri and Donna had been training for months as part of the centre’s healthy lifestyle group and were joined by staff members Lina, Ellie-May, Heather, Jenny, Dawn and Anwen, along with Heather’s daughter Cala, and Anwen’s daughter Jena.

Canolfan Padarn Support Worker Ellie-May Watkins said: “The crowd gave the crew great support and we’re grateful to everyone who cheered us on. We’d like to say a huge thank you to Queens Road Bowling Club for use of their facilities on the day. Previously, Canolfan Padarn raised £330 for Cancer research, we hope that we will match or exceed that in sponsorship this year.”

Canolfan Padarn is a community resource base for adults with learning disabilities in Aberystwyth, offering social, leisure and work opportunities in the local area.

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