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Councillors back badger cull

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Blamed: badgers

Blamed: badgers

FRUSTRATION and no little anger were the keynotes of the County Council’s debate on a proposal to lobby the Welsh Government to permit a badger cull.

Councillors were told of the toll of the current policy had taken on farms, families, and communities. A packed Council Chamber heard harrowing stories of cattle being slaughtered late in pregnancy, outrage at discovering tests had delivered false positives, and an acknowledgement that there needs to be a broader approach than the one currently used. Proposing the motion, Cllr Gareth Lloyd began by setting out the nature of recent discussions members had held with their counterparts in Carmarthenshire and Pembrokeshire regarding the deepening crisis in west Wales’s agricultural sector.

The dairy and livestock sector, Cllr Lloyd told councillors, was under particular pressure and the incidence of bovine TB (BTB) in the locality, together with the method chosen to deal with it, was making the problem worse. Cllr Lloyd continued by pointing out that BTB was having a ‘devastating effect’ on the wellbeing of animals and humans, while exacerbating ‘the fragility of Ceredigion’s economy’.

He reserved the majority of ire for a direct attack on the Welsh Government’s policy, ‘in light of the complete breakdown of the unscientific vaccination programme’. Stating that it was necessary to ‘break cycle of infection’ Cllr Lloyd told members: “I do not bring this before you without giving a lot of thought. I would like there to be no culling, the truth is there is a culling scheme – but it is happening to cattle! “Official figures show that in Wales 82,500 cattle have been culled. That is more than the population of Cetredigion, to give an idea – and that does not include unborn calves. The experiences of farmers are almost like coming back from war. You have cattle hours away from calving, minutes, before they are culled. Farmer can see the calves moving inside their mothers before the cows are killed.

This is the kind of thing we can avoid. We have spent twenty years culling cattle, and last year the number of cattle culled was 27% up on previous year.” Acknowledging the complexity of the situation, Cllr Lloyd said: “As things stand, this cycle will continue. It is a fact that badgers contract TB and are A (emphasis added) factor, but not the only factor, in infecting cattle. We could carry on culling thousands of cattle every year, but something must be done to stop the root cause of the problem, or at least tackle part of it. I understand some people have strong feelings against this idea, but I am representing my community.”

Cllr Lloyd concluded: “We need to come to an agreement for farmers, families, communities and to cooperate with our fellow councils in west Wales.” Following the formal seconding of the motion by Deputy Leader Ray Quant, Cllr Gethin James congratulated Cllr Lloyd on putting such a compelling case forward. Cllr James continued by suggesting: “The political will to deal with the issue has been lost. In 2008, during a visit to Ceredigion, I remember a discussion about this with the then First Minister, Rhodri Morgan. He told me the evidence was there that a cull would work. “Our own AM, Elin Jones, was leading that. I think she wanted this to move forward. There was a legal challenge and the cull was delayed. Welsh Labour ditched the policy straight after the 2011 Assembly elections.”

Cllr Dai Mason told members that the decision should not even be made by the Welsh Government and that the Council should simply back a policy that allowed farmers to do whatever they thought necessary to protect their own stock. Cllr Towyn Evans was less combative, saying that there were no easy answers, he suggested that: “We are not proposing cruelty, but facing reality. The time has come, in the interests of humanity and people’s livelihoods, to make tough decisions and to make decisions that others will jump on to make political hay. “We are talking about targeting culls where TB exists. There is a genuine need for a political will to look at what’s happening in the dairy industry.” Highlighting the price collapse confronting dairy farmers, Cllr Evans said: “Farmers without contracts are now getting 12ppl for their milk.

That was 34ppl not so long ago. Families have invested in farms, they spend money locally. We must look at getting greater control of this issue. I agree with what Cllr James had to say about political will in the Assembly. There is a primitive system being used to test animals, and the system they are using is not fit for purpose. In this council, a rural council, we must have the will to be brave.” Cllr Dafydd Edwards addressed the issue in a different way and highlighted the loss of biodiversity in the countryside: “Badgers at one time, were endangered and were then protected. There are too many badgers now. It is time to for us to ask to look at lifting restrictions protecting badgers to reduce their impact on other wildlife; there is a lack of diversity thanks to badgers. We should look in more detail to see if there is a more sensible course of action to control their population and to review the impact on other wildlife. Cllr Lyndon Lloyd was very much more cautious than those preceding him: “The Government has accepted a scientific view as the basis for the vaccination programme. We might not agree with the scientific evidence, but if we are to present our own case we need to provide some science of our own.

“ We cannot simply say the process the Welsh Government is using is unscientific without showing why it is. We need to strengthen our case. As we have been debating here, BBC Radio Cymru has asked the Welsh Government for a comment. It claims the incidence is lower and the number of cattle culled is, too. “Vets have accepted the vaccination programme, some with misgivings, and we need to address that. “I can foresee the Assembly sending a letter back to us saying, ‘prove it’.” Responding to Lyndon Lloyd, Cllr Gareth Lloyd said: “We can use their evidence against them. The Welsh Government insisted on a five year programme and said it had to be five years unbroken to be scientifically sound. “They have failed to deliver that. By coming to an end after the fourth year, they have broken that.

Now they say it is fine to wait a year, but cannot say whether it will start again next year.” Cllr Paul Hinch picked up Cllr Lyndon Lloyd’s point: “This last Welsh Government has no about rural life in Wales or anywhere else. Unless vaccination is fully taken up, you cannot build up immunity. It’s not just the money, it’s the way of life. People get very upset about killing ‘cuddly animals’, but if they’re causing a problem they need management. If it takes a targeted cull, because the vaccination programme is incomplete, we should support that.” Cllr Alun Williams told members: “I understand the strength of feeling. I have had lots of emails about this topic. I would point out in England there has been intensive culling but that has not eradicated badgers in the affected areas. “My belief is there is no single simple solution to this and there needs to be a comprehensive science based policy. I cannot support only one solution. I fully support a motion to pressurise the WG to break the cycle of infection.”

His words were echoed by Cllrs John Lumley Hag Harries, who said they would abstain on the basis the evidence was not enough to back the motion. Cllr Peter Evans spoke at the end of the debate in support of the motion and made it clear that he could not support a petition in which one black and white creature was more equal than another. Highlighting the impact of the cull on the rural economy, Cllr Evans told members that: “We have to act, because farmers are the backbone of the rural areas. Farmers’ way of life is extremely important to the rural economies of the three counties. Ask the businesses who depend on them.” In a registered vote, an amendment to the motion to omit the recommendation of a cull only was supported by only 3 members with 4 abstentions. The motion was carried by 26 votes in favour to 1 against with 5 abstentions.

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Judge dismisses appeal in ‘truly disturbing’ animal neglect case

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A CROWN court judge has upheld a judgement of a case which saw the neglect and death of 58 cows. In his judgement, the judge described the offence as ‘truly disturbing’. The west Wales case related to the conviction of David Davies, and Evan Meirion Davies of Penffynnon Farm, Bangor Teifi, near Newcastle Emlyn.

They had both pleaded guilty to 13 charges of animal neglect in February 2019. They later appealed the Magistrates Court’s sentence banning them from keeping animals for five years. The brothers had frustrated the appeals process by securing adjournments in seven appeal hearings. Another request to adjourn the eighth hearing on Monday 2 December was not granted.

They also sought to appeal the guilty verdict despite pleading guilty to the charges earlier in the year.

The prosecution followed a visit by Animal Health Officers and Animal and Plant Health Agency vet to the farm in April 2018. Officers found 58 cattle carcasses in various states of decay in the cattle sheds and surrounding fields. The remaining cattle were housed in terrible conditions with no food, water or dry lying area.

The vet confirmed that the cattle were being caused unnecessary suffering, and that the dead cattle had succumbed to the horrendous conditions found in the sheds, and died of neglect.

The vet had to euthanize two cows to stop further suffering during visits to the premises. This is one of the worst cases of animal welfare neglect seen by the Animal Health team of Ceredigion County Council. Alun Williams is Ceredigion County Council’s Corporate Lead Officer responsible for Policy and Performance. He said, “We had no doubt that the judge would uphold the judgement of the Aberystwyth Magistrates Court.

Although we have been frustrated by the delay caused by the appellants, we are satisfied with the result. “The vast majority of Ceredigion farmers take excellent care of their animals and uphold high standards of animal welfare. We will make sure we pursue the small minority who do not.

We will not hesitate to prosecute in such devastating cases of animal neglect.” Their initial sentences were upheld.

They were sentenced to 16 weeks imprisonment suspended for 12 months, and were disqualified from keeping any animals for five years. The brothers will be allowed 28 days to dispose of the herd.

They were ordered to pay costs to the council of £420.

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New Integrated Care Centre opens

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Services together in one place: The Cardigan Integrated Care Centre

CARDIGAN’s brand new Integrated Care Centre will open its doors to the public on Monday, December 9.
Hywel Dda University Health Board says the new Centre will bring joined-up care to local communities for the first time.
The opening of the centre follows hot on the heels of the launch of a similar initiative in Aberaeron. It represents a decisive change of direction in the way the Board delivers health and social care services to a largely rural area.
The new centre was developed with £23.8m of Welsh Government funding
The centre will provide a modern, fit for purpose healthcare service – including a GP practice, dental service, and pharmacy. It will also host a range of other clinics and services delivered by Hywel Dda, the third sector, local authority. and partner organisations.
Those services include:
• A nurse-led minor injuries walk-in service with telemedicine links to the emergency department
• Radiology and diagnostics
• Phlebotomy service
• Outpatient suite with consulting rooms and clinical treatment facilities for pre-assessment and outpatient consultations by visiting clinicians and social workers
• Disease-specific services for heart failure, motor neurone disease clinics, and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease services
• Enhanced telemedicine equipment in clinical areas, providing remote access to specialists from across the professions
• Rehabilitation services, providing opportunities for intensive and slow stream rehabilitation to restore function and improve independence, supported by therapists, nurses and social care staff within the Community Resource Team
• Mental health and learning disabilities services
• A base for the local Community Resource Team in south Ceredigion, including the Acute Response and District Nursing teams
Steve Moore, Chief Executive of Hywel Dda University Health Board, said: “This is an ambitious step forward for our health board, which embodies the strategy we agreed last year to shift our focus to community and primary care. It has taken many years of planning and there have been challenges along the way. We’ve had to work very hard to make sure that we’ve got it right the first time.
“In particular, the hard work and commitment from our staff, and the support of many stakeholders – particularly our local communities – has been a critical part of our journey. It is with these groups in mind that we begin delivering on our ambition of providing safe, sustainable, integrated care for our local population.”

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Ceredigion success at Welsh Indoor Rowing Championships

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THERE was success for Ceredigion at the Welsh Indoor Rowing Championships bringing home nine medals.

Held on Friday and Saturday, 22 and 23 November at the Channel View Leisure Centre in Cardiff, this was the 20th anniversary of the event. The aim in Ceredigion is to grow indoor rowing and to promote the local Sea Rowing Clubs.

On the Friday, 14 children from Aberaeron Comprehensive School and Ysgol Bro Teifi, Llandysul took part in the school event. Some had competed last year for the first time, while others were rowing in the competition for the first time. The standard was exceptionally high, with schools from both Wales and England, with 9 records being broken within the 20 races that were held on the day.

Three medals were won in the school event. Beri Tomkins, Ysgol Bro Teifi; Finley Tarling and Dylan Gwynne Jones, Ysgol Gyfun Aberaeron each won a gold medal. 10 of the children achieved their own personal best times with Beri and Finley even broke national records.

On the Saturday, the club races were held where two junior medals and four senior medals were won. Dylan Gwynne Jones won a gold medal for 4min row under 16. Beri Tomkins won a gold medal with a new personal best of 543 metres rowed in two minutes. Beri now holds four records – year 6 school and Welsh record; and year 7 school and Welsh record.

In the adult event, Leo O’Connor won a bronze medal for 60+years 500m; Hannah Lodder won two gold medals for Ladies 40+ years 500m and Ladies 40+years 2km; and Sam Owen won silver medal for Ladies 40+years 2km.

There are weekly Indoor Rowing sessions held at Ysgol Bro Teifi, Llandysul; Aberaeron Comprehensive School; and Bro Pedr School, Lampeter. These sessions are supported by CRIW which are the indoor rowing group within Ceredigion. CRIW also run sessions on a Monday evening at Aberaeron Leisure Centre.

Rhidian Harries, Active Young People Officer, said, “The Young Rowers from Ceredigion have done fantastically well at this national competition. The event was very well organised, and many English schools that are recognised as rowing schools attended. However, the children from Ceredigion showed that they could compete against anyone. It’s a great credit for them and also for CRIW, who have been working tirelessly to grow the sport in the area. Their support and enthusiasm has been crucial, and they should take great pleasure in the success and the performances of these young rowers.”

CRIW will be running their own Indoor Rowing Competition at Teifi Leisure Centre, Cardigan on Saturday, 28 March 2020. Search them on Facebook for more information.

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