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Education

10 weeks in Tanzania

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Ella Wilkinson: Volunteering in Tanzania

ELLA WILKINSON, a student at the University of Wales Trinity Saint David, recently returned from 10 weeks volunteering in Tanzania with Raleigh International as part of the UK Government-funded International Citizen Service (ICS) programme, and is now calling on other young people to take the plunge and consider volunteering overseas.

Ella, 20, worked in partnership with Tanzanian volunteers on a project run by international development organisation Raleigh International as part of the ICS programme, where she worked alongside Tanzanian volunteers to providing training and resources to support young entrepreneurs in rural communities.

ICS volunteers, aged 18-25, work on long-term projects that seek to end poverty in some of the poorest countries in the world. The scheme offers young people the chance to gain valuable new skills while working on projects that make a genuine difference to the people they work with and their communities. Those aged 23-35 can also apply to be ICS team leaders.

Ella studies Environ mental Conservation and is now in her second year at UWTSD. An end to global poverty is considered essential for achieving the UN’s 17 Global Goals for Sustainable Development, which include ‘Climate Action’ as well as ‘Affordable and Clean Energy’, directly related to the course offered by UWTSD. Ella looks forward to her module in Sustainable Development next academic year and hopes that her time in Tanzania will enhance her learning.

Ella said: “I would not have had the opportunity to volunteer in Tanzania if it wasn’t for UWTSD. Opportunities like this are life changing and I’m so fortunate to have been able to take part in such a fantastic scheme with the support of my university – I was overwhelmed by people’s generosity!

“Raleigh ICS is a unique opportunity to work alongside people from a different culture and make a difference at the same time. I’d encourage young people like myself to apply!”

Lili Marfani, Director of ICS, said: “It’s great to hear Ella is encouraging other young people to apply for ICS. We’re passionate about supporting young people from across the UK and using their energy to tackle poverty. Our experience of working with young people shows they really can take on the big issues and make a difference in people’s lives.

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Education

Wales’ first law department celebrates 120 years at Old Bailey

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Left to right: Lauren Marks, President of Aberystwyth University Old Students’ Association; Ben Lake MP for Ceredigion; The Rt Hon. Elfyn Llwyd, Pro-Chancellor of Aberystwyth University; Dr Emyr Roberts, Chair of Council of Aberystwyth University; The Rt Hon. Lord Lloyd Jones; Meri Huws, Aberystwyth University Council member; The Rt Hon. Lord Thomas of Cwmgïedd, Chancellor of Aberystwyth University; Professor Emyr Lewis, Head of the Department of Law and Criminology, Aberystwyth University; Professor Tim Woods, Pro Vice-Chancellor for Learning Teaching and Student Experience, Aberystwyth University; and Professor Anwen Jones Pro Vice-Chancellor for Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, Aberystwyth University

Wales’ oldest university law department has marked its 120th anniversary with a celebratory event at London’s top criminal court.

Law has been taught at Aberystwyth University since 1901, and in the 120 years that have followed more than 9,000 students from almost one hundred countries have graduated and launched their careers from the department.

The Central Criminal Court of England and Wales provided an illustrious setting for the first of two prestigious events held to mark the 120th anniversary of the longest-established law department in the country.

Alumni of the department include several Ministers of State, politicians and leaders, many who have gone on to develop distinguished legal careers, and those who have achieved success in other professions.

Held at the ‘Old Bailey’ in London, the celebratory event was attended by alumni, staff students and other special guests, including Ceredigion MP Ben Lake. The Guest Speaker was The Rt Hon Lord David Lloyd-Jones FLSW, Honorary Fellow of Aberystwyth University.

The special anniversary will be celebrated at a second event to be held at Amgueddfa Cymru – National Museum Wales in Cardiff on the evening of Friday 10 June. Alumni wishing to attend can find more information on the University website: www.aber.ac.uk/en/development/newsandevents/law-anniversary-dinners

Chancellor of Aberystwyth University, The Rt Hon. Lord Thomas of Cwmgïedd, said: “The history of the teaching of law at Aberystwyth is an inspiring story of dogged determination by a small number of indomitable individuals who laid the foundation for the highly-respected department you see today. In 1899 when it became clear that there was widespread support for the ambition to establish a law department in Wales to provide a broad education in legal principles, funding was raised through the generosity of members of the Bar circuits of north and south Wales, and amongst London Welshmen, with many firms of solicitors and individuals making contributions and pledging recurrent annual support.”

Professor Emyr Lewis, Head of Aberystwyth University’s Department of Law and Criminology said: “From its embryonic foundations at the beginning of the twentieth century, the teaching of law at Aberystwyth has flourished.  Today, as well as excellent teaching which has always been a hallmark of the Aberystwyth approach, the department offers numerous opportunities for students to develop practical skills and hands-on experience.  

Students have the chance to undertake casework in our Family Law Clinic, acquire and practise advocacy skills through our Mooting Society, volunteer with ground-breaking research projects such as Dewis/Choice and the Veterans Legal Link Project, and benefit from our new Law in Practice modules which are designed to begin filling the gap between the traditional core knowledge gained through a law degree and practice.”

Louise Jagger, Aberystwyth University’s Director of Development and Alumni Relations, said: “The long tradition of philanthropic giving at Aberystwyth University continues to this day and was also celebrated and promoted at the dinner.  Over recent years we have embarked on our largest ever philanthropic campaign to transform the iconic Old College into a major cultural and creative centre for Wales to mark the University’s 150th anniversary.

“Part of our plans for the Old College include a Law Room and Moot Court to honour and celebrate the rich contribution that the Law department has made to the University through the provision of a space for public engagement and for enhancing the public understanding of the law. The facility will provide a dedicated venue and resource centre for Moots, the Law Society, debates, seminars, exhibitions, public lectures and alumni gatherings.  Students past, present and future will benefit from this excellent facility. We are grateful to the alumni and friends who have already donated towards this goal and will be inviting further contributions right up until the reopening of Old College in 2024.”

Professor Tim Woods, Aberystwyth University’s Pro Vice-Chancellor for Learning, Teaching and Student Experience, said: “It is a pleasure to join alumni and friends from across the country to celebrate the Department of Law and Criminology’s contribution to Aberystwyth University and its impact on the world over the past 120 years.

“The University itself is celebrating its 150th Anniversary this year, and we look forward to reuniting with alumni and supporters at celebratory events in Cardiff, Aberystwyth and London over the coming year to mark this important milestone.”

Aberystwyth University was awarded University of the Year for teaching quality and student experience (Good University Guide, The Times and Sunday Times 2021) and also University of the Year for teaching quality two years consecutively, and Welsh University of the Year (Good University Guide, The Times and Sunday Times 2020).

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Education

Funding for music education trebled to the tune of £13.5m

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Every child will have the opportunity to benefit from music education as part of the Welsh Government’s plans for a national music service, which will help ensure no child misses out due to a lack of means.

As the National Plan for Music Education is published, the Minister for Education has confirmed funding will be trebled, with £13.5m being invested over the next three years.

The plan will make access to music education fairer and more consistent across Wales, with a particular focus on learners from low-income households and those with Additional Learning Needs. Support will be available for children and young people to access and progress with music tuition, with learners from disadvantaged and under-represented groups supported to join music ensembles.

The plan includes a number of key work programmes such as:

A review on music tutors’ terms and conditions, to ensure they are treated equitably and are recognised properly.
A ‘First Experiences’ programme to offer children in primary schools a minimum of half a term of musical instrument taster sessions, delivered by trained and skilled music practitioners.
A ‘Making Music with Others’ initiative, including opportunities for children and young people in secondary schools to gain industry experience through working alongside musicians and creative industries
A new national instrument and equipment library to support access to a resource bank to be shared across Wales.
These programmes will be rolled out from September 2022, supporting schools and settings to give all children and young people from the ages of 3 to 16 the opportunity to learn to play an instrument as well as singing and making music in our schools and our communities.

The National Music Service will operate as a ‘hub’, with the Welsh Local Government Association co-ordinating the Music Service’s programmes with a wide range of organisations. It will help schools and settings in their delivery of the Curriculum for Wales and provide more diverse opportunities for children and young people to experience music outside schools and settings.

First Minister of Wales, Mark Drakeford and the Minister for Education and Welsh Language, Jeremy Miles, visited St Joseph’s Cathedral Primary School in Swansea to see a cluster of primary school children taking part in a ‘Play Along’ session led by Swansea Music Service.

First Minister Mark Drakeford said:

“The establishment of a National Music Service for Wales is an important commitment in our Programme for Government and I’m delighted that we are delivering on this pledge.

“Learning an instrument was a formative part of my upbringing and a lack of money should not be a barrier to any young person who wants to learn to play music. We are fortunate in Wales to have a strong tradition of school, county and national ensembles, and we want to make sure that our children and young people are able to play a full part in these. This funding will support music services in schools and within the community to help nurture our young musical talent.”

The Minister for Education and the Welsh Language, Jeremy Miles said:

“Our vision is for all children and young people across Wales, regardless of background, to have the chance to learn to play an instrument. The plan we are publishing today, backed by funding, will help deliver that vision.

“For too long, the chance to learn an instrument and develop musical skills has been for those few whose families and carers who can afford tuition. I want to make sure everyone has the opportunity to access music tuition, and that’s why we’re making this significant investment to deliver a range of activities for our children and young people to learn and experience the joy of music.

“The development of the National Music Service will ensure that we nurture our next generation and continue to produce new talent and showcase Wales to the world.”

WLGA Chief Executive Chris Llewelyn said:

“We are proud to work with the Welsh Government on delivering this vital service to children across Wales. Many families in Wales can’t afford an instrument, and this funding will go a long way to opening doors to children across Wales to have the opportunity of learning an instrument.

“Playing an instrument and reading music is a very important skill for a child, and music brings enormous joy to children. Local authorities believe that children across Wales will have better access to instruments, and this plan will develop many future talented musicians, and support pupils to develop their musical skills.”

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Education

Celebrating 10 years of the Coleg Cymraeg Cenedlaethol

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Elin Jones MS reflects on the Coleg’s work

THIS year the Coleg Cymraeg Cenedlaethol is celebrating 10 years since its establishment. With its roots deep in Ceredigion, and a wide range of courses available through the medium of Welsh at Aberystwyth University, we need to celebrate and note the work of the Coleg to date.

When the Coleg was established, its aim was to increase the amount of subjects that could be studied through the medium of Welsh at universities across Wales. 

By now 1,135 of staff within our universities are able to teach through the medium of Welsh, and over 1,900 of students have received an undergraduate scholarship to follow their studies through the medium of Welsh. 

By 2019 a total of 4,740 full-time students were studying at least part of their higher education course through the medium of Welsh.

Elin Jones MS said: “Aberystwyth University students played a leading role in the establishment of the Coleg Cymraeg Cenedlaethol, when they caught the country’s attention with their protests asking for education through the medium of Welsh at the beginning of this century. 

“The work the Coleg has done has been of great importance, and they continue to ensure that more and more opportunities for studying through the medium of Welsh are available. Not only does this secure the future of the Welsh language, but it is also contributes to creating a professional workforce that can work effectively in Welsh.” 

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