Connect with us
Advertisement
Advertisement

News

Storm clean-up priority for National Park Authority

Published

on

storm cleanPEMBROKESHIRE COAST NATIONAL PARK AUTHORITY is continuing to prioritise storm clean-up work following the continued extreme weather as it attempts to keep access open wherever possible.

A total of 35 locations around the National Park experienced damage in the early January storms, ranging from the accumulation of debris to the loss of coastal land and dunes. Inland, flooding and high winds resulted in severe gully erosion to some bridleways and brought trees down across paths.

Although the majority of repairs or diversions had been completed at these locations, some suffered further damage during the early February storms and some work will have to be repeated.

National Park Authority Access and Rights of Way Manager Anthony Richards said: “Repairing the storm damage is a priority in order to make sites and paths as safe and accessible as possible. Some repairs will be temporary and more permanent work will take place after the late February high tides.

“The emphasis on repair work on car parks, beach access paths and the Coast Path in readiness for the main visitor season is in the interest of all users, local communities and not least, the local economy.

“Public safety is our primary concern and the Authority is advising people to stay away from dune areas as erosion from the high tides has resulted in many dunes becoming unstable and in danger of collapse.”

Following an update to the National Park Authority on February 5th, Chairman Cllr Mike James and Authority Members thanked officers for their prompt response to the damage and for their continued hard work.

Cllr James added: “I would also like to extend a thank you to members of the local community who have volunteered to help with the clean-up effort, including Coleg Ceredigion students who cleared debris at Newport Parrog and Newport Sands and pupils from Cardigan School who helped at Poppit Sands.”

While every effort is being made to keep access open, more complex issues at two popular locations at opposite ends of the county have resulted in a prolonged closure as further investigations and expert advice is taken in order to find the best possible long-term solution.

As a result, the access path down to Caerfai beach near St Davids remains closed as a landslide has undermined the beach access footpath midway down the slope.

On the Coast Path at the Penally end of Tenby South Beach, the viewing platform and beach access steps were severely damaged by the January storm and a further three metres of Coast Path were lost due to dune erosion. An alternative route is in place and, until the dune system has stabilised, it is not possible to fully assess the options or develop a long-term solution.

Sites and paths considered dangerous or out of repair for their intended use such as wheelchair suitable paths have been temporarily removed from the Park’s website until they can be repaired. In each case an explanation is provided for this interruption via on-site signage.

National Park Rangers are working with Keep Wales Tidy, the National Trust and Pembrokeshire County Council to coordinate a series of volunteer clean ups of beaches and public land on beach heads. Residents of local communities and voluntary wardens have also been turning out to help with this task.

A funding bid has been awarded by the Welsh Government to help cover the costs of the clean-up to the Wales Coast Path, while all other avenues of funding are being explored to limit the cost to the Authority.

For up to date information and advice following the storm damage please visit www.pembrokeshirecoast.org.uk.

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

News

New Quay RNLI lifeboat crew trains with lifeguards

Published

on

NEW QUAY lifeboat station hosted a special training evening with the lifeboat crew and Ceredigion’s RNLI lifeguards last week.

Pete Yates, one of New Quay RNLI’s inshore lifeboat helms, worked closely with Ceredigion lifeguard supervisor, Tirion Dowsett, to plan scenarios for the teams to practice working together in casualty care situations.

A large scale scenario included four casualties to be dealt with by the inshore lifeboat crew and two lifeguard teams on a nearby beach, whilst a third lifeguard team and lifeboat crew members dealt with a separate scenario at the lifeboat station.

Pete said: “It was a great evening of training. We had 9 lifeguards and 13 lifeboat crew in attendance.

“The main scenario included casualties suffering from hypothermia and propeller injuries. A second scenario involved a mechanic suffering head injuries in the forepeak of the all-weather lifeboat and requiring extraction on a stretcher.

“On completion of these scenarios we all gathered back at the station where one of our senior crew members sprung a great act at being a diabetic having a hypo, and being suitably angry and aggressive.”

Roger Couch, New Quay RNLI’s Lifeboat Operations Manager, added: “It was great for our lifeboat crew members to work with the lifeguards as it builds a deeper understanding of each other’s roles and encourages teamwork between us. This is of great benefit when dealing with real life casualty care situations.”

Continue Reading

News

Coastguard rescues dog stuck on cliffs

Published

on

LAST TUESDAY (Aug 27), New Quay RNLI’s inshore D-class lifeboat, Audrey LJ, was tasked by Milford Haven Coastguard to assist the Coastguard with a dog stuck on the cliffs near New Quay.

The volunteer crew launched the inshore lifeboat at 1.50pm with four crew members on board and made their way south down the coast.

Brett Stones, New Quay RNLI’s helm said: “We located the dog on the cliffs by Castell Bach, near Cwmtydu. We stood by while the Coastguard team caught the animal. The dog was unharmed and safe with the Coastguard so we were stood down.

“However, while returning to station we were then tasked to a small vessel with engine failure. We towed the stricken boat with three people on board back to New Quay. We rehoused the inshore lifeboat and it was ready for service by 2.40pm.”

Continue Reading

featured

New maintenance Lorries cut carbon emissions

Published

on

The Ground Maintenance Team has purchased three new lorries to support ground maintenance services in Ceredigion.

The new lorries will move Ceredigion County Council’s Ground Maintenance Service’s equipment to and from the grounds that they look after. The lorries will also take cut grass away for composting. This provides the most efficient way of maintaining the areas that the team is responsible for.

Councillor Dafydd Edwards is the Cabinet member responsible for Highways and Environmental Services together with Housing. He said: “The new vehicles replace ones which had provided excellent service for almost 20 years. They are fitted with Euro 6 engines which are considerably more efficient and better for the environment.”

The Grounds Maintenance Team is also incrementally introducing electric-powered mowers, blowers, hedge cutters and strimmers into its fleet. This equipment is better for the environment, is easier to use and causes less noise and vibration.

The new lorries support Ceredigion County Council’s commitment to be a net-zero carbon council by 2030.

Continue Reading

Popular This Week