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27 care failings before baby’s stillbirth

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A DOCTOR whose conduct of a difficult birth was heavily criticised by the General Medical Council remains on the GMC register as a member of staff at Hywel Dda UHB.

Alan Treharne qualified for appointment to the specialist register as a consultant obstetrician in October 2016.

On March 12, 2017, was responsible for the management of the delivery of a child following a complex and difficult pregnancy.

Arthur Wyn Jones was stillborn and Dr Treharne’s conduct of the birthing process was panned by a subsequent investigation.

Kara Jones and her partner Sam Penfold from Tre’r Ddol originally attended Bronglais Hospital. However, due to Ms Jones’ Type 1 diabetes, the pregnancy was complicated and Ms Jones was directed to the notionally safer consultant-led facility at Glangwili, almost three hours’ drive from her home.

In a report on S4C’s Newyddion Nawr on Tuesday (Aug 13), the couple said during the pregnancy became increasingly concerned over both the consistency and standard of care they received at Glangwili’s Ante-Natal Unit.

“We didn’t have a clue. Had no idea what was going to happen. Every time we went back there [Glangwili], they told us ‘we’re not sure about this, we’re not sure’,” she said.

Their baby, Arthur Wyn Jones, died 24 minutes after being delivered on March 12, 2017.

Ms Jones said that her reports that the baby had stopped moving were brushed aside and that her concerns about the course of her pregnancy as she approached the delivery date were similarly ignored.
Newyddion Nawr, which had a copy of an internal Hywel Dda UHB investigation, reported that medical staff ‘missed [numerous] opportunities to acknowledge the complexity of the pregnancy”

The failings in the care given to Kara Jones and her unborn child included several failings to act on abnormal scan results and not acting quickly enough to deliver Arthur when there were clear indicators the birth was going badly wrong.

Newyddion Nawr reported that the Board identified 27 separate indicators which should have raised the alarm were missed or ignored by medical staff during the pregnancy.

The consultant obstetrician responsible for overseeing the delivery received a formal warning from the General Medical Council in June last year. That warning expired just over six weeks ago, on June 29.

No restriction was placed upon Dr Treharne’s practice despite the content of the warning, which reads: “Dr Treharne failed to obtain an adequate clinical history for the patient; failed to adequately assess readings of foetal heartbeat and contractions; did not arrange continuous monitoring; did not appreciate the full significance of the clinical risks; and wrongly concluded that there was no immediate urgency to deliver the patient’s baby. The baby was stillborn.

“This conduct does not meet with the standards required of a doctor. It risks bringing the profession into disrepute and it must not be repeated. … Whilst these failings in themselves are not so serious as to require any restriction on Dr Treharne’s registration, it is necessary to issue [a] formal warning.”

Dr Treharne is shown on GMC records as a member of staff awaiting revalidation by Hywel Dda Health
Board. The responsible officer for revalidation is shown as Dr Philip Kloer, Executive Medical Director and Director of Clinical Strategy for the Health Board.

Responding to the Newyddion Nawr report, the Director of Nursing, Quality and Patient Experience for the Board, Mandy Rayani, said: “On behalf of Hywel Dda I wish to offer our sincere condolences and apologies for the distress experienced by Ms Jones and her family.

“A thorough investigation was undertaken by the health board as well as the GMC. This resulted in a number of recommendations to change procedures and clinical pathways.

“Additional learning and training for the whole multidisciplinary team have taken place across the health board area. We wish to provide assurance that all of these recommendations have been implemented.”

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Llanwrda bookshop in the running to be named Britain’s Best Small Shop of 2020

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AN appointment only bookshop in Llanwrda, Carmarthenshire, which offers a beautifully curated collection of books as well as cards, wrapping paper and Fair Trade gifts, has been named on the shortlist of retailers in the running to be named Britain’s Best Small Shop of 2020.

Books At The Dragon’s Garden says it “aims to make a visit to our shop an experience”. The shop runs a loyalty scheme for customers and offers promotions throughout the year. In addition, in its base at the market garden it uses organic compost, seeds and freshly picked vegetables and flowers. It only uses paper bags and has planted lots of pollinators in the garden to increase biodiversity.

The Best Small Shops competition is managed by the Independent Retailers Confederation (IRC), whose member trade associations represent approximately 100,000 independent retailers throughout the UK between them. The competition celebrates the commitment and creativity of independent retailers on the UK’s High Streets and the central role they play in their local communities. It is sponsored by Maybe*, an engagement platform that helps make social media work for independent retailers. The winner will be announced next month.

In addition to the main award, Books At The Dragon’s Garden has also been shortlisted for a special award to be given to the independent retailer that has demonstrated specific innovation to combat the impact of COVID-19. This award is sponsored by booost, the loyalty, gifting and promotions app.

“It was impossible to make my previous shop both safe and financially viable, so I had a radical rethink and a conversion of two old stables at my market garden meant I was able to move the entire shop to a rural location,” explains owner Mandy Tomos.

In the interim I continued to promote the business on social media and sold online via the website. I received an award as a “Local Hero” for continuing to supply my local community during lockdown. As the shop is now appointment only, it is very safe for both customers and staff, numbers are low and social distancing is easy. Contactless payment is taken outside under cover. I used social media to maintain contact with my customers and wrote a chatty book suggestion column in our local free paper every month.”

“This has been a particularly challenging year for small, independent retailers and many have come through to this point through innovation, quality of product and service, a commitment to serve their local communities and a large dose of determination,” explains Mark Walmsley, Chair of the IRC.

“As more and more people have been forced to stay home and work from home, we have seen just how much we all value local independent shops and want to see them not just survive, but also thrive. These shops offer choice, diversity and genuine customer service. And, after what has been a rather dark year, that has to be worth celebrating.”

The annual competition highlights the best of Britain’s independent retail sector, celebrating the commitment and creativity of independent retailers and the central role they play in their local communities. Previous winners have included Bristol-based delicatessen Papadeli, the 2019 winner, and The Mainstreet Trading Company, a combined bookshop, café, deli & homeware shop based in St Boswells, in the rural Scottish Borders, which won in 2018.

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Safe Zone arrangements during firebreak

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Aberaeron Safe Zone

FOLLOWING the announcement by First Minister Mark Drakeford that introduced a ‘fire break’ across Wales, Ceredigion County Council will not be closing the roads daily within the safe zones between 6pm on Friday, October 23 and 11am on November 9.

Some aspects will remain where changes are in place 24/7 or temporary parking restrictions apply. Council owned public car parks will remain free during this period for residents and visitors alike.

Safe Zone – Recent amendments

Further minor amendments have come into effect this week, they are:

· In Aberaeron, on street parking will return between Cadwgan Place and Market Street junction.
· In Aberystwyth, there is controlled blue holder access to Eastgate from Portland Street as well as controlled access to Chalybeate Street from Terrace Road.
· In Cardigan, there will be controlled blue badge holder access along High Street.

Safe zones are reviewed fortnightly in line with the infection rate and available evidence. A further announcement will be made before 09 November.

More information can be seen on the safe zones Council web page: www.ceredigion.gov.uk/SafeZones

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Two week national ‘Firebreak Lockdown’ announced for Wales from 6pm on Friday

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MARK DRAKEFORD, The First Minister of Wales has announced a two week ‘fire break’ lockdown from Friday October 23 at 18:00 HRS, to last until Monday November 9 at 00:01 HRS

Mr Drakeford said: “This firebreak is the shortest we can make it. It must be sharp and deep in order to have the impact we need it to have on the virus.”

All non essential businesses, including tourism businesses will be told to close.

Businesses have been told that they will be given £1000 each automatically to help with the economic impact of the shutdown.

Mr Drakeford added that children will be the priority and that childcare facilities will open as normal. Primary schools will open after half term.

Secondary schools will be closed for a week after half term to help control the virus.

Universities will offer a mixture of face-to-face learning and learning via video link. Students must stay at their university accommodation during the lockdown.

Responding to the Welsh Government’s announcement of a Wales-wide lockdown, Paul Davies MS, the Leader of the Opposition in the Welsh Parliament, has called the lockdown “not-proportionate” and is calling on the Welsh Government to be “open and transparent” on the evidence to support a lockdown and if the First Minister is committing Wales to rolling Wales-wide lockdowns every month.

Paul Davies MS said: “Sadly, the First Minster has failed to get public support for this second Wales-wide lockdown, failing to be open and transparent about the evidence to justify this lockdown and what his actions will entail for the future.

“The Welsh Government also has to be honest that this road they are taking us down is committing Wales to rolling Wales-wide lockdowns. This is not a two-week break to solve the pandemic, it is likely that we will see regular lockdowns across the rest of the year. The Welsh Government must be clear what actions they are taking during the lockdown to prevent further Wales-wide lockdowns which will have a significant impact on people’s lives and livelihoods.

“However, the main concern is that this national lockdown is not proportionate. The impact on businesses in areas such as Powys, Pembrokeshire and Ceredigion, who have the lowest rate of Covid-19 cases in Wales, will be severe at a time when they are desperately struggling to recover from the pandemic so far this year.

“The First Minister needs to urgently come to the Welsh Parliament and answer these questions, to face effective scrutiny by elected representatives and not run his government by media.”

Preseli Pembrokeshire MP, Stephen Crabb told The Herald: “The evidence to support an all-Wales lockdown is weak and I am sceptical that this so-called ‘fire-break’ will tackle the situation in those parts of Wales where infection rates have been out of control. The key issue for Welsh Government to address is what will be done differently after the firebreak ends in those parts of Wales where infection rates have spiralled out of control. Otherwise the whole of Wales risks being dragged back into a series of rolling lockdowns.

“As we saw earlier in the year, lockdowns come with huge costs in terms of harm to the economy and to people’s emotional and mental wellbeing. With the Welsh Government asking UK Government to fund this lockdown, I hope that as many businesses as possible get support they need quickly. Pembrokeshire’s hospitality businesses will be hit particularly hard by these latest restrictions and I will be fighting hard again to see that they are protected as the lockdown kicks in.”

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