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Dyfed-Powys Police lead chaplain, Reverend Tom Evans, to retire after “greatest nine years of working life”

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REVEREND Tom Evans (just Tom to officers and staff) is a bit of a legend in Dyfed-Powys Police, he has given his time freely and passionately to serve as the lead force chaplain for the past nine years – supporting officers and staff at the worst times of their lives and in the most challenging circumstances, but also cheering them on and celebrating with them at the best of times.

He’s been there for it all, and everyone knew that he was available 24/7, 365 days a year – astonishing dedication considering it was a volunteer role. In 2019, he clocked up a 1,000 hours volunteering, and this was pretty typical for him annually. He’s had a few desperate late night calls in this time, and stayed up talking until the early hours when the person on the other end of the phone needed it, and also taken calls whilst he and his wife Marilyn were holidaying abroad. But that’s the essence of Tom, nothing is ever too much trouble for him, and he genuinely and deeply cares about each and every person in the organisation.

He can be credited with ensuring that the multi faith Chaplaincy is now a part of the fabric of the organisation. He leads a team of 19 remarkable chaplains, which includes an Imam, volunteering throughout the force area – and he is quick to point out that it is the collective effort of them all that has guaranteed their ongoing success.

Commenting on his decision to retire, he said: “All things considered, I think it’s the appropriate time to leave, however sad I am to do so. At my age I think it is common sense. I retired from full time employment in 2008 – after an interesting and rewarding career. I was in the ministry first, moved onto world development matters with Christian Aid, then moved to media where I became a radio producer and presenter of programmes focusing on religion, and finally worked as a University lecturer. But volunteering as a Police chaplain has been a tremendous experience – one I wouldn’t have missed for the world, it’s been an absolute privilege. And I can honestly say it’s been the greatest nine years of my working life. The camaraderie and friendships I found when I joined the family community that is Dyfed-Powys Police will stay with me forever – I’ve met extraordinary people who have changed my life.”

The role has changed a lot over the nine years, and the chaplains are very much an important part of the operational response of the force. But he had to work hard at the beginning to gain the trust of officers and staff, who may have been a little cynical and wary of taking him into their confidence. He always resisted having an office, as he felt it was important for him to be in the company of and around officers and staff so that they could get to know him, and have plenty of opportunities to start informal conversations on the ground. Part of his (and the team’s) success is the fact that he’s always provided a non- judgemental, listening ear to all, whether they have faith or no faith, and speaks to everyone in a language they can understand.

Tom has enjoyed the varied nature of the role, and it has been far broader than just supporting staff in their day to day working life. He has been asked to conduct funeral services for staff and their loved ones, he’s married a few couples, blessed wedding rings, visited staff in hospital, done home visits, sat and provided comfort to some who were gravely ill and anything in between. He’s been in the thick of people’s highs and lows – be they work related or in their personal lives. Retired staff have also been known to reach out to him.

He has also supported officers and staff through some of the most tragic cases the force has had to deal with – notably the abduction and murder of April Jones (where he stayed up in the Machynlleth area for two weeks) and the fire at a farmhouse in Llangammarch Wells where a father and his five children lost their lives. His work on both earned him a Chief Constable Commendation and a Certificate of Appreciation respectively. He also won the accolade of Volunteer of the Year in the force awards in 2017. And although he was moved and humbled by these awards, he’s clear that it’s the people he’s helped through their sorrow and challenges that mean the most to him, and knowing he’s made a difference to them is recognition enough.

Tom is seen as a hero to many teams and individuals – and this was particularly true of the Disaster Victim Identification Team deployed to the tragic Llangammarch Wells fire.

PC 154 Thomas Draycott was part of the team, and said: “Tom is just one of those special people who puts people instantly at ease.  You can feel his genuine interest in people and you as a person whenever or wherever you speak to him.  He made numerous visits to our DVI team working on the protracted Llangammarch Wells fire recovery and it was clear that his visits were solely for the purpose of supporting us personally. With the weeks of long hours away from home, very difficult working conditions, and the extreme weather conditions, Tom’s positivity and warmth meant the world and he quickly became a bit of a hero within the team.  Each of his visits gave the team a much needed lift.  Even simple things like his amazing ability to remember everyone’s name adds to his personal touch. He will be sorely missed.”

At the conclusion of the recovery at the scene, Tom was humbled to be asked by the weary officers to conduct a service of closure and memorial inside the ruins – a very moving service that he will never forget, and he recalls there wasn’t a dry eye there.

Chaplaincy has not only been nurtured by Tom within Dyfed-Powys Police, but he was also central in introducing it to the Welsh Ambulance Services NHS Trust. As an emergency service, they’d seen the benefits the Chaplaincy brought to staff in the police, and wanted the same service to be available for the wellbeing of their staff. Following discussions, Tom offered to coordinate and facilitate this for the Trust to get them started, and by January 2020 a volunteer chaplain was in post. The timing was opportune, considering the incredible pressure that was to be placed on the emergency service and its staff a short time later because of the pandemic.

The development of the Chaplaincy and ensuring its longevity has been a priority for Tom, demonstrated by his determination to secure a Continuous Professional Development Programme in Chaplaincy Studies with the University of Wales Trinity St David. The programme gives all blue light chaplains UK wide an opportunity to study for a Post- Graduate Certificate, Diploma and ultimately a Masters Degree in Chaplaincy Studies.

Chief Constable Mark Collins said: “We value all volunteers at Dyfed-Powys Police and can’t thank them enough for the support they provide us with. But I think I’m among many of my colleagues when I say Tom really stands out. He is part of a team that do outstanding work – and he has nurtured the Chaplaincy to the success it is today. He will be a hard act to follow, and his commitment to developing it and ensuring its future success is clearly demonstrated in his work on introducing the diploma in Chaplaincy studies.

“Our officers and staff see some truly harrowing and tragic events, and when people really need somebody to listen to them at times when they are really struggling, Tom has always been there, day or night. He has become a bit of a father figure for Dyfed-Powys Police and truly enriches the wellbeing of the force. He has put his heart and soul into the role. The workforce are always telling me he’s one of the nicest, most genuine and caring people they’ve ever had the pleasure of meeting, and the real difference he has made to their lives – inside and outside of work. We are all very sad to see him go.”

Tom Evans being presented with his award

Police and Crime Commissioner, Dafydd Llywelyn added: “Tom Evans has been an exceptional volunteer for the Force over the last ten years or so.  As chaplain, he has always been there for us through some challenging and difficult times; day and night. He has provided exceptional support and pastoral care to officers and staff and the wider policing community at times of difficulty and distress.

“I have been struck, but not at all surprised, at the huge amount of good wishes that have been sent to Tom since he announced his decision to retire. I want to add my own tribute to the way he has undertaken his duties and to note that he has gone well above and beyond what would have been expected.

“He will be very much missed by me and staff from my office and the extended policing family. I wish him a long, healthy and happy retirement.”

The Police Federation and Unison representatives also work closely with the Chaplains and recognise the significant role they can play in the welfare of officers and staff. Chair of the Dyfed-Powys Police Federation, Chief Inspector Gareth Jones said: “I have known Tom for several years, both during my time in Ceredigion and also since taking over as the Federation Chair. I have had the pleasure of knowing him professionally as well as personally and have always found him to be extremely approachable, caring and always willing to listen.

“I have witnessed first-hand the support he has provided to officers and staff who have experienced ill-health, bereavement or work and personal related issues. He leaves a massive void in the force chaplaincy and will be greatly missed across the force. I wish him and Marilyn all the very best for the future.”

Unison Branch Secretary Karen Phillips and Brach Chair Phil Williams have expressed their sincere gratitude to Tom for his unwavering support to their members in their times of need, and indeed the support he has given them personally in their roles to help their members.

Reflecting, Tom concluded: “Police officers and staff are a remarkable group of people. They experience traumatic and life changing events regularly. Some people get the impression that they are hard like anthracite. But I always tell people to look beyond the uniform, inside the uniform is a human being, full of emotions, like you or I. There have been times when officers have said to me that were it not for the support they received from the Chaplaincy, they would have left the police. And it is those extraordinary people, who’ve found the strength and commitment to carry on serving their communities, that have made my role as chaplain so rewarding.”

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Warning of serious disruption on M4 and M5 today due to fuel prices protest

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POLICE have warned of “serious disruption” to drivers using the M4 and M5 on Monday 4 July due to a planned protest.

Protesters intend to block the Prince of Wales Bridge from 7am until 7pm as part of a nationwide campaign against rising fuel prices.

The protest is due to start at the M4 Magor services at junction 23A eastbound and the Clevedon Interchange at junction 20 of the M5 westbound.

It is also expected to cause disruption to the M48 Severn Bridge and the M32.

Drivers are being urged to avoid the area or plan alternative routes.

Bristol Airport has issued a warning urging travellers to allow extra time if heading to or from the airport.

Police said additional officers will be brought in to ensure the protest is carried out legally.

Drivers have been advised by Gwent Police to work from home where possible and avoid the area between 7am and 7pm, with protestors planning to block parts of the road between M4 Magor services, junction 23A eastbound, and Junction 20 of the M4 between those hours.

Chief Superintendent Tom Harding said: “Gwent Police, and Avon and Somerset Police, are working jointly with neighbouring police forces and partner agencies to ensure emergency and critical services continue and to reduce disruption to both road users and local communities, however we are preparing for serious disruption throughout the day.

“I would encourage drivers to reconsider their journey, consider working from home and avoid the area where possible.

“The right to protest under UK law must be balanced with the rights of the wider community who may be affected. We have additional officers and support in place on Monday to ensure the protest is carried out in accordance with the law.”

The planned protest is thought to have been organised by the Facebook group Fuel Price Stand Against Tax, and has attracted both criticism and support online.

The latest travel disruption comes following the closure of the Severn Bridge for a second consecutive weekend, as well as the Severn Tunnel rain line which will be out of use until July 10 due to essential work. Motorists will be unable to cross the M48 Severn Bridge until 6am on Monday as it is undergoing essential work for eight months.

The bridge was first shut last weekend as painstaking work to repair and replace corroded suspension cables began. Traffic on the bridge is likely to be very heavy on Monday due to the fuel protest.

Police have told protesters banners must be tightly secured to vehicles and nobody should be walking around on the bridge during the demonstration. Protesters will stay inside their vehicles or stand beside them.

An organiser said: “We will now only be doing it on the Prince of Wales Bridge. We have to keep in mind everyone’s safety and if we block the bridge totally and there is an emergency there would be hell. Yes it means only one bridge but [due to the amount of traffic caused] there will still be a massive impact.”

Two weeks ago one of the initial M4 bridge protest organisers Ashley Fowler said : “We’re all car enthusiasts and we have all been worried about fuel prices and when I saw the post about blocking the bridges we began talking about it. Then people started asking me to make an event so we could update each other.

“I made the event because I run a car club in Cardiff which I started on social media during the pandemic lockdowns to help people’s mental health. When we can we go out to car parks and just meet up and have a chat but during the pandemic we weren’t able to do it so I made the group.

“Now we can’t meet up so much again because of the cost of fuel. I know some of them can’t drive so much because they need to feed their kids. It’s serious. People are getting really depressed about it. One of the boys in the group has actually sold his car due to fuel price rises.”

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Ceredigion’s Energy Efficiency work recognised at the Wales Energy Efficiency Awards

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ON June, 17, 2022, Wales Regional Energy Efficiency Awards were held in Cardiff. Ceredigion County Council’s Energy Efficiency Schemes scooped 2 awards.

The Energy Efficiency Awards were introduced to help recognise the fantastic work being undertaken by the energy efficiency sector in Wales. The measures were introduced to help homeowners reduce their energy bills, tackle fuel poverty and reduce Carbon emissions.

Ceredigion County Council have been delivering the ECO Local Authority Flexibility scheme along with the Warm Homes Cozy Ceredigion Scheme for a number of years. These schemes have seen a number of insulation measures and heating systems being installed in properties improving their energy efficiency. With the drive towards renewable heating systems the concentration lately has been on the installation of air source heat pumps.

The Council scooped the top prize for the Regional Council or Local Authority of the Year where one exceptional council in each of the 11 Regional areas of the UK has shown a true commitment to promoting energy efficiency within their region. This award was sponsored by Improveasy.

For this award, the judges look at the impact their work has had within the local community, what their customer and local community have to say about the council, what level of expertise the council has within its own teams and what priority the council gives to tackling fuel poverty within its current plans.

The Council also won the Regional Vulnerable Customer Support Organisation of the Year having shown a true commitment to improving the lives of vulnerable people within their region. This award was sponsored by Consumer Energy Solutions.

Councillor Matthew Vaux, is the Cabinet Member responsible for the Housing Service. He said: “I would like to congratulate the Housing team for their hard work and success at the Regional Energy Efficiency Awards this year. With the current rise in fuel costs and the increase in cost of living, this is a fantastic achievement for the Council’s housing team in showcasing that they are helping our residents save energy and combat fuel poverty.”

Find more information about Energy Efficiency Schemes on the Council’s website: www.ceredigion.gov.uk/resident/housing/financial-assistance/energy-efficiency-schemes/

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The Welsh Government launches Basic Income pilot scheme

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FROM 1 July 2022, more than 500 people leaving care in Wales will be offered £1600 each month (before tax) for two years to support them as they make the transition to adult life.

Launched by First Minister Mark Drakeford, it is hoped the pilot will set care leavers on a path to live healthy, happy and fulfilling lives.

The radical approach has trust, autonomy and respect at its centre. It will provide independence and security to people who have faced immense challenges during their childhood, giving them greater control and empowering them to make decisions about their future.

The £20 million pilot, which will run for three years, will be evaluated to carefully examine its effect on the lives of those involved

Social Justice Minister Jane Hutt said the scheme is a direct investment in the lives and futures of some of Wales’ most vulnerable young people.

Those taking part in the pilot will also receive individual advice and support to help them manage their finances and develop their financial and budgeting skills.

Local authorities will play a key role in supporting them throughout the pilot. Voices from Care Cymru will also work with the young people to give them advice on wellbeing, education, employment and help them plan their future after the pilot.

To launch the scheme, First Minister Mark Drakeford, Social Justice Minister Jane Hutt and Deputy Minister for Social Services Julie Morgan met with people taking part in the pilot, and young people who themselves have been in care, to talk about the impact this support will have on peoples’ lives.

They discussed how they hope the financial stability will give people the opportunity to make positive life choices as they leave care and provide a more solid foundation from which to build their adult lives.

First Minister Mark Drakeford said: “We want all our young people to have the best possible chance in life and fulfil their full potential. The state is the guardian of people leaving care and so has a real obligation to support them as they start their adult life.

“Our focus will be on opening up their world to all its possibilities and create an independence from services as their lives develop.

“Many of those involved in this pilot don’t have the support lots of people – myself included – have been lucky enough to enjoy as we started out on our path to adulthood.

“Our radical initiative will not only improve the lives of those taking part in the pilot, but will reap rewards for the rest of Welsh society. If we succeed in what we are attempting today this will be just the first step in what could be a journey that benefits generations to come.”

Minister for Social Justice Jane Hutt said: “We’re in the midst of a cost-of-living crisis like no other and we therefore need new ways of supporting people who are most in need.

“Our Basic Income pilot is an incredibly exciting project giving financial stability to a generation of young people. Too many people leaving care face huge barriers to achieving their hopes and ambitions; such as problems with getting a safe and stable home, to securing a job and building a fulfilling career. This scheme will help people live a life free of such barriers and limitations.

“We will carefully evaluate the lessons learnt from the pilot. Listening to everyone who takes part will be crucial in determining the success of this globally ambitious project. We will examine whether Basic Income is an efficient way to support society’s most vulnerable and not only benefit the individual, but wider society too.”

Tiff Evans of Voices from Care Cymru, speaking on behalf of young people who have experienced care, said: “This is a brilliant opportunity for care leavers in Wales. It is good to see that care leavers in Wales are being thought of and Welsh Government are providing this opportunity for them as young people to become responsible, control some parts of their lives and have a chance to thrive and be financially independent.

“We thank Welsh Government for investing in them and their future and we look forward to other changes and developments for care experienced young people in Wales in order for them to reach life aspirations.”

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