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Farming

FUW to focus on family farms at Eisteddfod

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eistTHE FARMERS’ UNION of Wales will highlight the importance of family farms and their links to the wider rural community during the National Eisteddfod at Llanelli next week (August 2-9). 

On Sunday and Monday (August 3-4) of the event Carmarthenshire farmer’s wife Nicola Dickenson will display her range of kids clothing “Kids Casuals” at the FUW stand. Nicola diversified from farming after deciding that the income of the farm was not enough in 2001. Using her own farming-themed designs to create t-shirts, sweatshirts, caps and socks for kids, the clothing is designed and printed on the farm at Esgair Farm, Llanpumpsaint. She believes her clothes have a personal touch, highlighting a farming theme featuring tractors and diggers, as she understands how appealing these are to children of all ages. She and her husband Martin, a PCSO for rural policing serving in Carmarthen, have been farming for over 20 years running the 72-acre farm with a small suckler herd. In the near future they hope to go into direct meat sales. Representatives from Agri- Advisor will also be at hand on Monday (August 4) between 10am and 4pm to provide advice on farming issues and concerns. On Tuesday (August 5) at 11am there will be an “open discussion” at the stand on a range of topics covering rural crime and farming policing links, with Dyfed-Powys Police chief commissioner Christopher Salmon. Members will get a chance to discuss current farming issues on Wednesday(August 6) when Labour MP Nia Griffith, Plaid Cymru AM Rhodri Glyn Thomas, Welsh Liberal Democrat AM William Powell and FUW director of policy Nick Fenwick visit the stand at 11am. On the afternoon of Tuesday and Wednesday (August 5-6) there will be free milk tasting from local supplier WJ Phillips and Sons of Cwm Dairy Farm, Cwmffrwd, Carmarthen. The family business, which has been running for over 45 years, delivers milk to households and businesses in an area stretching from St Clears to Pontyates. One of their businesses is Castell Howell food wholesalers. The family purchased the dairy milk round business in 1969 from FUW member, Brian Thomas, Gelliddu, Carmarthen. The business is now run by Mr Phillips’ sons Mike and Dorian. They milk 90 Holstein Friesian cows with 55 followers, own 85 acres and rent another 25. “What makes their milk stand out and what their customers like, is the fact that they can chose between homogenised or non-homogenised milk and we look forward to tasting it,” said FUW Carmarthenshire county executive officer David Waters. “We are also looking forward to the prose medal presentation on Wednesday at 4pm. “This prestigious award for the best piece of prose on the topic of ‘confrontation’ has been sponsored by the FUW Carmarthenshire branch with a prize fund of £750,” added Mr Waters. On Thursday and Friday (August 6-7) local weaver Judy Roberts will be displaying her craft skills. She has been spinning for 40 years, designing garments and patterns to suit the yarn produced. She mixes natural fibres such as silk, wool, alpaca, cashmere, angora, yak and camel to produce some outstanding yarns. She has taught knitting and knitwear design in Llandeilo and runs a weekly knitting group in Llanarthne and additionally provides personal tuition in the art of spinning. “Throughout the week, children will be able to enter farming-themed colouring competitions with a range of prizes and are invited to find the ear tag of Tegwyn the cow as she travels across the country. “Children can pick a square on a coloured numbered board to guess where she has lost her ear tag on her travels across Wales. “Each square costs £1 and the money raised will go to children’s hospice charities Ty Hafan and Ty Gobaith. “Representative from the YFC and RABI will be on the stand daily and we look forward to welcoming representatives of land consultants Philip Meade by the end of the week to our stand,” added Mr Waters. Throughout the week there will be a warm welcome, as well as light refreshments, for all to enjoy and members of FUW Carmarthenshire staff will be on hand to discuss general farming issues.

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Farming

Welsh Cobs return to the farmyard at Llanerchaeron

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Welsh Cobs at Llanerchaeron

HORSES have returned to the traditional farmyard at Llanerchaeron near Aberaeron, which is cared for by National Trust Cymru. 

Tomos and Seren, two eighteen-year-old Welsh Cobs, have been living together for over a decade and recently moved into the Welsh farmyard. 

Visitors will be able to meet the horses when they visit, during certain times of the day at the stable blocks.

Please check opening times before visiting www.nationaltrust.org.uk/llanerchaeron.

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Farming

Ceredigion farmers left high and dry by lack of UK-NZ trade deal protections

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PLAID CYMRU politicians have expressed significant concerns regarding the impact the new trade deal stuck between the UK and New Zealand will have on Ceredigion farmers. 

The free trade agreement between New Zealand and the UK Government was signed on 28 February 2022 and is set to open the doors to a significant import of meat produce which could potentially hit the farming sector in Wales harder than in any other part of the UK. 

NFU Cymru has recently raised concerns about the deal, stating that the potential negative cumulative impact of this cannot be overstated. 

The New Zealand trade deal follows another similar deal with Australia, and while it offers significant upsides for farmers on the other side of the world, it potentially creates significant marketplace changes for Welsh farming. 

Figures from the Farmers Union of Wales state the agreement could see the amount of beef that can be imported tariff-free from New Zealand rise immediately to 12,000 then gradually to 38,820 tonnes in ten years’ time. Further rises would occur in the subsequent five years, after which there would be no limit. A similar increase would also be seen in lamb, with the amount that could be imported tariff-free would increase by 35,000 tonnes per annum in years one to four, then by 50,000 tonnes per annum in years five to fifteen, after which there would be no limit. 

Plaid Cymru’s Agriculture Spokesperson, Mabon ap Gwynfor MS, has today (2 March, 2022) raised the issue as a matter of urgency with the Welsh Government in the Senedd. 

Mabon ap Gwynfor MS said: “While the spin will be about benefits, the truth is that this trade deal is a real cause for concern for Welsh farmers. 

“The agreement will provide a 15 year transitional period, and it states that they will only be able to ‘utilise new access to the UK sheep meat market once they have filled 90% of their existing World Trade Organization (WTO) quota’. 

“However, this leaves Welsh farmers at the whim of a market whereby they have no control nor input. Should something change in the sheep meat market then New Zealand meat would suddenly end up here or in the EU and undermine Welsh farmers. 

“By failing to ensure that there are tariffs on imports here the UK Government have left Welsh farmers completely open to the whims of a market which they have no say and no protection. 

Cefin Campbell, Plaid Cymru Member of the Senedd for Mid & West Wales added: “Let us be clear, this trade deal is a gross betrayal of Ceredigion farmers. The UK Government’s own analysis suggests that the number of people working in agriculture will be negatively impacted by this deal, whilst it also threatens to undermine the entire Welsh agriculture sector – which we know is far more susceptible to harm from a poor trade deal than other farmers in other parts of the UK.  

As we face a climate emergency, importing more food from the other side of the world that could be produced sustainably here in Wales, does not make any sense whatsoever. 

Clearly, efforts must now be taken at Westminster to ensure that the Welsh farming sector is safeguarded from the potential negative impact of this agreement.”  

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Farming

Total Dispersal of Hidden Gem Welsh Dairy Herd

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Clywedog Abro Katie

HARRISON & HETHERINGTON have today announced that they will be the sale managers for the dispersal sale of 700 pedigree Holsteins from the impressive Clywedog herd. 

The two-day sale will be held on behalf of Rhys and Huw Jones at Old Llwyn Onn Farm, Wrexham, on Thursday 24th and Friday 25th February.

Day one of the sale will comprise 320 milking animals and 180 heifer calves up to six months of age. 

Day two will see 200 youngstock selling with in-calf, bulling and heifer calves down to six months of age. Notably, a large percentage of the herd and most of the in-calf heifers carry pregnancies by female sexed sires.

In the last two years Harrison & Hetherington have expanded their on-farm dispersal sales service across the UK and Ireland and Glyn Lucas, Senior Pedigree Dairy Auctioneer, is delighted that they have been invited to manage this special sale: “The Clywedog Pedigree Holstein herd is one of the UK’s best kept secrets. This complete dispersal sale offers the modern kind of cow that the modern milk producer appreciates. 

Auctioneer Glyn Lucas

“The cows are powerful and exhibit outstanding width of rump and chest, and are in excellent body condition. The production records on two times a day milking is impressive and the potential these cows have to increase on a three times a day or robotic management system is exciting. In addition, all of the animals going under the hammer have been tested for export.”

At the most recent milk recording in mid-January the herd averaged 41kgs at 4.42% butterfat and 3.31% protein with somatic cell count of 63.  The herd has exceptional fertility with the current calving interval running at 378 days and the current days in milk is 134 days.

The latest classification saw 17 new Excellent cows, 39 new Very Good cows, 14 new Very Good milking heifers and 24 new Good Plus heifers.  The sale will have a total of 41 Excellent, 141 Very Good and 138 Good Plus animals in the sale.

Herd health status is exemplary with IBR, BVD and Lepto protocols all managed in conjunction with farm vet, Rob George from Nantwich Farm Vets. Additionally, the herd has never had a case of TB and all animals are tested for export.

Clywedog Group Two

Giving further background, owner and breeder Rhys Jones said: “We established our pedigree herd in 1990 and have worked hard over the years to create high yielding, long-lasting herd of beautiful cows. Our mission has been to produce high type cows, and to that end we have selected the best genetics from Cogent and Semex. The stock is in excellent condition, they have been looked after with loving care and I know that the animals will go on to do very well. 

“However, the time has come for Huw and I to ease off; I will soon be 64 and it’s time to hang up my hat.  We would all like to thank everyone who has supported us over the years.  We have taken great pride in producing a herd with long lasting cows and heifers and we will both get a lot of satisfaction in watching our breeding develop in herd around the UK.”

Harrison & Hetherington are renowned auctioneers, selling all classes of pedigree and commercial livestock and is one of the UK’s foremost auctioneers for Dairy Cattle. Being located in one of the largest milk producing areas in the UK, its weekly sales at Borderway, Carlisle, attract top quality dairy cattle and buyers. 

Harrison & Hetherington are also the principal official society auctioneers to many breed societies and area clubs, and regularly hold dispersal or collective sales on site and on farms across mainland UK and Ireland.

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